The Brick – Coy Hudnall’s 1975 Bricklin SV1 LS Swap Project Car

The Brick – Coy Hudnall’s 1975 Bricklin SV1 LS Swap Project Car


I’m Coy Hudnall, I am an engineer at Holley
Performance and this is Sara, my wife, and my project car. It’s a Bricklin, we’ve never had a project
car before, we’ve been looking at trucks and cars and really didn’t know what we wanted
until we saw this one on Facebook market place. We had never heard of a Bricklin either, this
is actually number 1802 out of just under 3000 ever made. It’s not a kit car, it’s a true North American
manufactured production car. They were made in 1974, 75, and a few in 76
before the company went under. So it’s actually the only North American manufactured
production car with gull-wing doors. The previous owner had parked the car in 1992,
never registered it after that point, we washed it a couple of days ago, the first time that
it had been washed in 27 years, so it’s a little bit of a barn find for us and we’ve
pretty excited about it. The Bricklin was developed to compete with
the Datsun 280Z and the Corvette. It actually was a little faster in some form
than the Corvette, I doubt it was very much faster in very many ways but this one might
be. This car was quite famous back in its day,
it was in several movies, several TV shows, it was that car, you know whenever the next
generation of something comes out you see them in all the movies, this was that car
then. The color of this car is safety orange, get
it, safety orange right. The paint, well it’s not paint, it’s actually
acrylic over fiberglass. It’s 40000ths thick color, acrylic color,
over fiberglass. That was supposed to be a great idea back
in 1975, it wasn’t a good idea at all, it cracks really bad. Now this car is a model number SV1, now you
would think that SV stands for Super Vehicle or Special Vehicle, but it stands for Safety
Vehicle. It’s got a ton of 1975 safety feature built
into it, I’m not going to bore you with them all, one of them that we do enjoy though is
that it is a full steel frame car, it has what they quote as a full steel roll cage,
we do like the safety aspect of it too because we plan on driving the car quite a bit. So one of my favorite things about the car
is the doors. When I grew up in the 80s, I loved Lamborghinis,
I always wanted a Lamborghini but honestly, I’m never going to be able to afford a Lamborghini
so this does have the doors that go up. If the doors were working today, which they
are not, they did work last week, a lot of things, the engine runs great, last week,
but I can’t keep it working right now so we’re not too worried about it because we are going
to change it all up, but the doors, if you were in 1975, you walk up with what I call
your vending machine key and put it in the lock and activate the system and then you
would open the door with this rocker switch, that would make the door go up, that would
make the door go down, it’s usually on an air system nowadays for the ones of these
that exist, the hydraulic system that the cars came with didn’t last long at all. I’m going to open this one very manually so
we’ll see how that goes. The doors weigh about 100 pounds, that’s part
of the safety feature of this car to protect you as well as the frame being really high
kind of like in a C4 Corvette but this is done for safety so that in a side impact that
frame would protect the driver and the passenger. So that is the door up. I plan to do a complete custom interior, fabricate
it, design it, I’ve got some experience doing interior work and fabrication. I’m excited about that, I won’t get into that
too much right now. This is kind of cool. See the clock on the radio? It’s one of those roller clocks like your
grandmother had, it actually flips over little panels to change the time. So under the hood, which this is also a factor
that we really like, is that it’s the conventional layout, the 74 came with AMC engines, the
75s like this one came with Ford 351 Windsors and a three-speed automatic transmission,
so I mean it was a sports car, it had power, about 200 and something horsepower any way
or 100 something, I’m not sure, but it wasn’t a lot, but it had a V8 in it. We are taking this engine out this weekend
and starting the swap process. We have hopes of an LT Gen 5 GM engine, that’s
where we are going with this and if there is room in this little car, we’re going to
try to put two turbos in there for a twin-turbo system, that’s our hopes anyway. The transmission will be a 4L80E, we’ve already
bought that transmission, we will also, of course, have to work on the rear end, do something
there, change it out. I have dreams of a Ford link rear suspension,
that’s probably my loftiest of all dreams because I don’t know if that will be able
to materialize or not but that is in the long list anyway. We’re definitely going to change the wheels,
I’d like to, I’d hate to even mention this but I’d like to bring the flares down on it,
but that’s also on the very long list, put some really wide tires on the back, but that
gets into some fiberglass work, we’ll see. We wanted a car that if we needed to cut a
hole in it, we didn’t mind cutting a hole in it, we want to make this ours, we plan
on keeping it and so we are going to customize it quite a bit. One of the main reasons for this car, for
me really wanting the car was to put as many Holley products on it as I can. I’ve worked for Holley for nearly ten years
and I love my company that I work for and I love the products that I help them make
and I’m excited to have something now that I can actually put those products on and show
them and actually use them. Now our goals timewise are to keep us moving
so that we don’t stall out, I hope to have this car at LS Fest this year in some form
or fashion, and then Power Tour next year is our goal, but that’s again, lofty but we’re
shooting for it. So this is Sara and my 1975 Bricklin project
car, wish us luck. I just don’t know if I’m going to head out
to work in this thing yet or not.