Sweet Point’s Setter Tales (S1, E1)

Sweet Point’s Setter Tales (S1, E1)


I’m Wade Kisner and I grew up hunting upland birds. Nothing’s better than chasing a couple of English Setters called Sweet Lou and Adeline. Lou is a Master Hunter and Adeline is quickly learning the trade. These are some of our tales. (Wade) Rooster! I had a feeling the ‘thumbs up’ would work. (Wade) Over the last couple of years I’ve developed… a real passion for hunting with English Setters. I got Lou about six years ago as a ten week old puppy and Adeline has just turned two years old. Yeah, Lou has a real interesting story. Back in 2008, my good friend Ray had raised a litter of puppies. One of the puppies he was left with — nobody picked him out of the litter, he was the last one… and for whatever reason Ray brought him over to my house and uh… said, “Here’s your dog.” (Tyler) English Setters are trained to assist the hunter in the field… by locating a bird using their nose. When they detect a scent the go on point– (Wade) Most of the time without even being able to see the bird, they’re just pointing on the scent alone. (Wade) They hold that point steady until the hunters get a chance to come in and flush the bird… shoot that bird, and then, get released for the retrieve. (Wade) Louie. Alright, buddy? Nice and warm in there, isn’t it? Good. Ready to roll. Alright, got everything. Hey Scott. (Scott) Morning Wade. (Wade) Morning. Good to see ya! (Scott) This is only my third time to be out working with dogs and hunting over dogs and uh… truly fascinating to watch em’. (Wade) Alright, it’s Sunday morning and we’re headed down to Riverside, IA to uh… Highland Hideaway Hunting. Gonna try to work the dogs on some birds. Got my friend Scott and my son Tyler with me today and uh… Hopefully they shoot better than I do. You guys hearing that now? (Tyler) Yeah. (laughter) (Wade) A lot of enthusiasm in the truck here. We’ve got a young female dog that we’re trying to get some uh… some bird experience. (collar beeps) It’s about 18 degrees, a little bit of a wind. That breeze will be helpful to the dogs to uh… pick up the scent on these birds. (Scott) I’m hunting today with an old Remington model 1100. Uh… It was from my grand dad. (dogs whining, shotguns racking) This is Adeline. She’s a two year old tri-color English Setter, and she’s the one we’re going to be working specifically with today to try to get her some bird action and see how she does on retrieving. I’m gonna have — Tyler I think I’m gonna have you kinda walk down there on the other side of the truck… we’ll push back to the north, away from that house — in case we have any birds down there — we’ll push them back up here in the field where we can uh… work em’… more towards the middle of the field, so I think that’s how we’ll start. (Tyler) She’s crappin’ in the middle of the road (laughter) (Wade) Come on Addie, come on… (sigh) That’s a good place to do it I guess. Let’s go right through this food plot. You know, sometimes you get lucky right off the bat. You don’t have to look real hard for birds and it was kinda the case that particular day. We set out in that field and right away it was obvious that dogs were getting some scent and were getting birdy. (Tyler) Come here Addie. (Scott) Never seen a dog like Lou before. Get em’ out there in the field working together, it’s like magic. Birds is a new phenomenal — I mean — at least these pheasants. Uh… big game as we grew up in Texas, we did waterfowl, quail, dove, uh… but no pheasants. Uh… coming up here, it’s the first time I’ve been on any kind of pheasants so… (Wade) We started pushing though the field to the north, got down along a fence line and we could tell that Lou was on a bird. Shortly thereafter Addie started getting very birdy too. (chatter) (collar beeping) We use these electronic collars. When the dog stops moving the collar detects the lack of motion and makes the collar beep. If we’re not able to see the dog in the field, and hear the beep, we know he’s on point. (collar beeps) (chatter) (Wade) He must be down into that timber… (chatter) Woah. Woah! One of the roosters was running down through a wooded thicket which kinda made it hard, we just couldn’t get in there to get a shot. Woah, Addie. Woah, Addie! Good girl! Addie’s got him pinned here. (chatter, collar beeps) (Tyler) There he is! (gun shots) (Scott) That’s some fast flying birds! (Tyler) So we lost the bird. Dad blames the warm weather… and the brush… You know, over the coarse of the season my ammunition had ran a little low and, so I thought I’d try to cheat and use some 7 1/2’s. He’s always blaming something. At least that the excuse I’m going to use. “It was like 19 degrees, my fingers were frozen to the gun.” (Wade) Aww s***! (Tyler) Sometimes you just gotta keep moving. (Wade) So after we lost that bird we kept pushing and as you get to the edge of this field it kinda has a slight hill that comes down — it ends in some timber and there’s a small creek it kinda… meanders down through there. (Tyler) You gotta be careful anytime you’re carrying firearms on unsteady terrain. (Wade) Eww, big hole here guys, be careful. It’s a widow-maker there for sure. (Wade) Birds typically, especially if they’re running ahead of us will go down into that little timbered area. Lou works those ravines and if there’s a mud hole someplace, he’s gonna lay it in. He does that all the time. What’s happening I think is uh, the birds — it’s a little warmer today… So the birds are running ahead of us. So the dog goes on point, the bird meanwhile, is running a little ahead of us, so what I think we’re going to do is push it just a little bit further. We had walked near the entire length of the field already. Finally, Lou was on point! So here’s Lou standing there on this beautiful point and I tell one of the guys, “I think we’re in position. Walk in there and flush that bird out.” (Wade) Must be down into that timber. (Tyler) You want me to cut over? (Wade) …and I’ll be damned the bird comes out… Woah! Rooster! (Tyler) Wouldn’t shoot! and not a one of us is in position. Thing gets a free ride. (Tyler) We ended up walking a little further, then we heard to beep. (collar beeps) (Wade) I’m gonna try to kick it out of there somehow, but I don’t know where he’s gonna go. (Scott) Right there! (Wade) You guys ready? I knew we only had a second or two. (Tyler) Pheasants arn’t like quail. They don’t sit. You have to react quick to the dog’s point and get up there. Rooster! (gun shots) Bird down. Dead bird! Finally! They’re a real pretty bird. We had one bird in the bag, then — outta nowhere — Good boy! (Wade) The most enjoyable part of hunting for me is dog work. It’s really gratifying. (Tyler) Had some good time with my dad and a good friend, and couldn’t ask for anything else. (Wade) We started this tradition where we would always stop and get a hamburger for the dogs after a good days hunt. Lou always tells me, “Hold the pickles.”