Slow Blues ‘Hack’ For Bass Players (in less than 5 mins)

Slow Blues ‘Hack’ For Bass Players (in less than 5 mins)


If you want your slow blues bass lines to
have more punch and impact, then you need to know about this trick. Hi, I’m Luke form
Become A Bassist and in this bass lesson, you’re going to learn a simple way to make
sure your slow blues lines feel just like the ones on your favorite recordings without
needing to change your gear or anything like that. [Video Intro] Welcome to Become A Bassist where it’s all
about insanely practical No B.S. bass lessons you can use to play better bass, have more
fun and become the best bassist you know you can be! Today it’s all about slow blues!
So what’s this trick I’m talking about that’ll make your bass lines have more punch
and sound more authentic? It’s actually to shorten your notes a little bit by coming
off on beat 2 and sometimes beat 4 – just about any time there’s a snare hit. When
you’re doing it, it’ll sound like this. [plays bass line] Hear how every time the
snare drum hits, the note in the bass line stops? I’m just muting the string with my
right hand. Sounds cool, right? What if you didn’t do that and kept all the notes long?
It’d sound more like this. [plays bass line] This isn’t bad, but the line doesn’t have
the same feel to it, right? And I bet if you listen to your favorite slow blues jams, when
things are still at the chill level, the bass is coming off on 2 and 4. Now when things start heating up a bit, then
this kind of goes out the window. If the drummer starts moving over to the ride cymbal and
the guitarist starts playing thicker, chunkier chords, then longer notes playing through
the snare hits make more sense. Check it out. [plays track] Hear how the track is busier,
so we’re going to make our notes longer. [plays bass line] You definitely want to lengthen
your notes when the intensity rises. If you keep coming off your notes on beats 2 and
4 when things are bigger and fuller, it’s going to sound a bit weird. [plays bass line]
Hear how when you mute your notes like this, it actually takes away from the impact, right?
The bass line starts sounding weaker and makes the whole song kind of anaemic, right? A good barometer for what to be doing in these
kinds of situations is the length of everyone else’s notes. Is the guitarist doing more
of this kind of thing [imitates guitarist] or this [and again]? If it’s the first one,
shorten up your notes. If it’s the 2nd, lengthen them out. Is the drummer playing
super short notes on a choked hi-hat? Or are smashing their ride or crash? If it’s choked
hats – used choked notes. If it’s a smashed crash, stretch those suckers out. This trick works really well – but only if
you know what to actually play over a blues, right? And if you need help with that or just
need more blues ideas, check out this video right here called 6 Authentic Blues Bass Line
Formulas That Work Every Time. Learn them and you’ll never ever have to fake your
way through a blues again and you’ll always have the perfect blues line you can pull out
at the drop of a hat. So when you’re ready, I’ll see you in that video!