Relationship Skills

Relationship Skills


– [Narrator] A child’s
future ability to succeed in the workplace, become a leader, and achieve long-term happiness
will depend in no small part on their ability to build
positive relationships. Students who learn to communicate clearly, cooperate with others and
constructively negotiate conflict are well are on their
way to future success. (gentle music) (marker scratching) (gentle music) (whooshing) – We’ve talked about self-awareness, which is understanding yourself, and then social awareness,
understanding others. So, getting into relationship
skills is really then, okay now you’re interacting. I’m not just standing over here thinking, I wonder what you’re feeling? I wonder what you’re thinking? I’m actually using that
information to engage. – In the classroom there
are lots of opportunities for kids to work together in
pairs, to work in small groups, to work in large groups so that they can actually practice this. So, we can intentionally
teach them explicitly, how do you disagree? How do you agree? How do you be respectful
in giving your opinion? How do you take on an active
role on a group project? So, sometimes before you actually
engage kids with a group, you talk a little bit about,
what are you going to do if one person is doing more
than their share of work? How are you going to
respond when one person doesn’t seem to be contributing? What are the different roles that we have as part of this group? Who’s gonna be taking notes? Who’s gonna be making
sure we stay on task? Who’s gonna be keeping time? Who’s going to make sure that
the conversation keeps moving? So, we can actually teach kids
how to be productive members of a group and give them
lots of opportunities in every class to work in groups. – You’ve probably heard
quite often the idea of project-based learning
or problem-based learning. And, so that’s not just
your typical project we’re gonna build something together, it’s actually thinking about,
okay, let’s take our learning and apply it to a real-world problem and then as a group
we’re gonna solve that. And it’s a wonderful way because
kids are learning content, they’re learning standards, but they’re also learning
relationship skills. How do we work together? How do we decide who does what role? How do we figure out
when we’re successful? What if we make a mistake? What if we don’t agree with someone? How do we navigate that? – It’s important to
build relationship skills with your children, because
it does foster trust. When kids feel that they can come to you and they could talk to you
about anything, you know, they’re less likely to go to their peers and get the wrong answer, sometimes. But it’s important to play
games with your children. I think sometimes as
parents we get so focused on the day-to-day tasks that
we forget to have fun. For example, it can be reading a book or watching certain TV
programs or going to the movies or going bowling. Things that will bring you together and bring you out of your comfort zone. I think sometimes it’s easy
to just kind of fall into a routine and a system
and just think, hey, we’re together and that’s okay, but it’s important to spend
time and be very specific about how you spend time so that that time allows for communication. – [Melissa] We want to
have healthy relationships with our partners, with our
children, with our friends. We know that a social network
and positive relationships helps us mitigate against
stress, against illness, it increases our longevity. Positive relationship skills
are critically important. (electronic music)