Red Fox (ACCIDENTAL) Catch, Cook, Bowdrill in the FOREST | ASMR (Silent)

Red Fox (ACCIDENTAL) Catch, Cook, Bowdrill in the FOREST | ASMR (Silent)


I am setting wire snares mainly in search of snowshoe hare which are very common here. Snowshoe hare are dual phase, and will turn brown in the summer. I accidentally caught this red fox in the snare. Red fox are also very common. It’s pelt is not as valuable as it was before, because people choose to use more synthetic, or plastics in their clothing. Wild animals are a renewable resource and do not result in pollution like artificial materials. As it is very cold, the fox is frozen stiff. It required several days of defrosting to be skinned. The tails are popular in some fetish circles. The meat of predators is not commonly consumed today. But historically, all animals were eaten, and nothing was wasted. The river is frozen over at this time of year. The moving water prevents it from freezing solid. It’s not safe to walk on, I will need to take the long way around. It is amazing where trees will grow. This dried grass will make an excellent tinder. So will cedar bark which sheds moisture. Birch bark holds a flame well as it is infused with oils. We have all the materials to start a fire now. Dead trees are ideal, as they are dry and will burn better. It’s important to have all your wood ready before lighting your fire. I am using a cedar spindle, with a cedar hearth board. It should take less than 60 seconds to produce an ember. Fires should be made bit initially in the winter and then allowed to die down a little for cooking. Drying the meat so oils will stick. Adding a special dry rub called “Woodobo,” which can be purchased from the link below. Searing the outside on a hot cast iron pan to seal in the moisture. Wrapping will help keep the meat extra tender The meat should be cooked slowly and long. The meat is quite tender. It can be pulled apart with just the fingers. All animals are edible, and preferences for meat is cultural.