PVCC 2018 Sonography Program Pinning Ceremony

PVCC 2018 Sonography Program Pinning Ceremony


(light pop music) – Good evening. I wanna welcome you
to our seventh annual Diagnostic Medical
Sonography Pinning Program. We are now 80 DMS students
strong as of tonight, alumni, so that’s a wonderful thing. (applause) The students on stage have
worked hard to get here tonight, and this honor is
not only theirs, but those who have shared
in their challenges to achieve their goals. We want to thank those
family members and friends. Colin Powell stated, “A dream
doesn’t come reality by magic. “It takes sweat,
determination, and hard work.” It is the hard work
over the past two years that we acknowledge tonight, and we celebrate our
students’ success, and speaking of hard work,
all these students on stage have taken and passed
their physics boards, and I’m very proud
of them for that. (applause) We have six of our
students have taken and passed abdomen boards, and the other six,
get to it, okay? And one has passed
OB/GYN boards. The rest, what are you doing? Let’s get it done. We’re gonna welcome
two to the school of Echo certificate this fall, and we’re gonna welcome one to the vascular
school this summer. Eight already have jobs, so
we’re doing really good here. I would like to introduce
the members of our college and sonography program. We have Dr. Frank Friedman. He is the President of Piedmont
Virginia Community College. (applause) We have Dr. John Donnelly. He’s the Vice President
for Instruction and Student Services. We have Jean Chappell, Dean
of Health and Life Sciences. We have Sylvia Dowell, Scholarship and Alumni
Associate Coordinator. We have Lisa Burrington,
our Clinical Coordinator for the Diagnostic Medical
Sonography Program. We have Peggy Bizjak, who
is now adjunct faculty, and recently retired UVA. (laughter) We have Ali Hutchinson. She is Culpepper Regional
Hospital Lead Sonographer and adjunct faculty, and I am Elaine Nichols. I am the Program Director
for the sonography program here at Piedmont. (applause) I would like to welcome
Dr. Frank Friedman for some opening remarks. – Thank you, Elaine. On behalf of the
Piedmont Virginia
Community College board, our faculty, staff,
and students, it’s my honor to welcome
you here tonight. Are you ready to celebrate? (applause) Now, that sounds more like it. Remember, this is a celebration,
not a solemn occasion, so go ahead and whoop and holler and let these folks know
how proud you are of them, because we are
very proud of them. Graduates, I wanna offer
my congratulations to you, but not just for
being here tonight, but for the decision you
made several years ago. You decided to seek
additional education and to enter this program. For many of you, I’ll bet
it was a difficult decision, wasn’t it? You had to ask yourself, should
I stay with my current job? Should I prepare
for something new? Can I afford this? How’s it gonna impact my family? Is it worth all the time,
the money, the effort? It takes courage to make
such a big decision, and I congratulate you
for having that courage. Now, you’re in a position
to reap the benefits of this education. There are extrinsic benefits. I heard that eight of
you already have a job, and that’s wonderful. Great job opportunities,
higher salaries, but there are also
other benefits. I’ll bet you didn’t know
that educated individuals tend to live longer. They tend to live healthier
and happier lives. And just as important
as those benefits, you have the pride in
your accomplishment, your improved self
esteem, your confidence, a better understanding
of the people around you. You have gained all
of these benefits due to your choice to
enter this program. So, now I ask you
the big question, was it worth the time,
effort, and money? Alright, I see a lot
of heads saying yes. That’s good. Well, I hope that all
of your future choices are as good as the one that
brought you here tonight, so congratulations, graduates, and congratulations to
your family and friends. (applause) – Thank you, Dr. Friedman. I would like to introduce
our next speaker, the Dean of Health and Life
Sciences, Ms. Jean Chappell. – Thank you. (applause) Thank you, Elaine. On behalf of the
faculty and staff of the Division of
Health and Life Sciences, I would like to welcome you to the Diagnostic Medical
Sonography Pinning Ceremony. This is truly a
day of celebration. We have pinning now. In a few short days,
you’re gonna have the big commencement
ceremony at, make sure I get it right, John Paul Jones Arena. I’m still new to
Charlottesville. Yay! In preparation for
this presentation, you know, this is always
a time of reflection. You think back to
when, you know, you’re sitting in
that seat, and for me, that was like 36 years ago, so I thought about, you know, all the things that have
changed in that 36 years. You know, landline phones
became cell phones, radios became boom boxes became
iPods became cell phones, LPs became eight track tapes, which you probably
don’t even know about, became CDs and then cell phones, and then, finally,
typewriters became computers became laptops became
tablets became cell phones. We all have cell phones. Lots of things have changed, but some of the things
that haven’t changed are really the things
that are most important. These are the
constants in your life that are gonna carry you
through to the next 36 years of your life, when
you’re standing here, things like a strong character, being committed to high ideals and having an
excellent work ethic, and the importance of
being part of a caring, loving community that you feel
like you are truly a part of. When asked about the
trials and tribulations of inventing the light
bulb, Thomas Jefferson said, “I haven’t failed. “I’ve just found 10,000
ways that just won’t work.” None of us is perfect, and some of you have
probably found 10,000 ways that you can’t do a
sonography, right, an image? And no one fails if he
learns from his mistakes. Don’t dwell on you failures,
but thrive on your successes. It’s not how many times you fall that determines your character, but how many times
you get back up. The challenges
that you face today are going to forge
a strong character that will be prepared to
meet the opportunities that you’ll encounter
in the next 36 years that you won’t even
know are gonna happen. These challenges to
prepare you to meet whatever you encounter with
courage and determination. Be committed to high
ideals and work ethics. As graduates of the DMS program, it’s clear that you have very
high expectations for yourself and that you meet those
expectations head on. The standards you set for
yourself are the standards by which others are
going to judge you. Set that bar high. Make the commitment
to raise yourself above those standards each
and every day, and lastly, the importance of being
part of a caring community, it can’t be over emphasized. According to the
Department of Labor, there are over 16 million
health related employees in the United States,
one out of every eight working adults are in
the healthcare field. Healthcare is a
service occupation. We go into healthcare
because we want to help and serve people, our
community, and our world. The small changes
each of us make can make incredible
things happen. There’s an African saying, and
it goes something like this: many small people
in many small places doing small things can
make great things happen. Charlottesville,
it’s kinda small. There’s no doubt about it, but you are certainly
not small people, and the work you do on
behalf of your patients, it’s never insignificant. However, each of you have an
opportunity to add your energy, your spirit, and your
talents to all the other healthcare professionals
in our community, and make wonderful
things happen. As you move from
student to professional, as some of your already have, reflect on how you can make
one small change in the world, in the neighborhood,
or just your workplace. As a healthcare professional,
you know the truth of what Albert Einstein
said over 70 years ago. “Only a life worth living for
others is a life worthwhile.” Congratulations again on
the end of your journey and beginning of your
next, but most of all, thank you for allowing us
to be part of that journey. (applause) – Thank you, Jean. I would like to introduce
our next speakers. These are graduate students,
Mark Fountaine and Emily Ooten. (applause) – Hey, this is fun. We were comparing our notes
in the parking lot, and hers look much
more professional. So, welcome, friends, family,
teachers, fellow graduates. I agreed to share
this honor with Emily, and then once I did, I
realized I had no clue what I wanted to say. I was joking with her
that I might just do a grand introduction
and then sit back down, and she did not think
that was funny at all. But this program has
been an amazing journey. As some of you have
probably heard many times, it was challenging, not just academically,
but emotionally, physically, and financially. All of you deserve
recognition for helping us get through that, ’cause
I know I was a pain. I don’t know about
the rest of them, but we have been tired
and frustrated, nervous, overwhelmed,
but we’re all here. I wanna personally thank you for sharing your loved ones with me. I have become friends
with all of them over the last two years, and I’m very happy to
have them in my life. These great people are some
of the most intelligent, compassionate, funny,
and supportive people I’ve had the privilege to meet, and I will always be
thankful for them, but I’m gonna step aside
and let Emily take over now. She likes a lot of clapping
and attention, so please. Thank you. (applause and cheers) – Thank you for that, Mark. I appreciate that. Good evening, everybody. Thank you so much for coming. At the risk of
sounding redundant, because I know it’s
been said a few times, I just wanna thank
our family and friends here with us tonight. You’ve made some pretty
massive sacrifices over the last two years. This group of
people on the stage, we’ve missed countless
family dinners, birthdays, holidays,
outings with friends, numerous other functions
with our loved ones due to the demands
of this program, and yet, here you all
sit on our behalf, so our gratitude for your
forbearance and support really can’t be over stated. Thank you so much. I also wanna just take a moment. One of our graduates
is not here tonight, Miss Sarah Christie. She was in a car accident. She’s okay, she’s stable, but we’re missing
her a lot tonight, so I just wanted to take
a moment to ask everybody to keep her in your thoughts. She’s very sweet. She’s a keystone
member of this group, so we really miss her tonight. There are also many thanks
due to our instructors, Elaine and Lisa. We would not be here today
if not for their guidance, and most importantly,
their patience. I remember, on our very
first day of class, almost two years ago now,
Elaine demonstrated to us what I still consider
to be the most important of many lessons she
has since offered. We had all filed into the class after a few nervous
introductions, and now that I think of it, it was probably the
first and only time our class was voluntary silent. Mark had a lot to do with that. In walked our instructor. She looked all business
and told us all to get out a piece of paper. She then gave us some very
confusing instructions on how to fold the paper. Seeing as none of
us had never taken an advanced level origami
class, we stumbled a bit, which, of course, was
her every intention. Slowly, a few people
started to figure out how to make the paper crane
or whatever else it was she was trying to
get us to make, and those students
started helping the
students around them. Eventually, we all
completed the task and looked hesitantly up
at our new instructor. She smiled a very warm smile
we would come to know well over the next two years and
came to the point of her lesson. She said to us, “This is
what it’s going to be like, “learning sonography. “It’s not going to be easy. “Some of you will catch on quick “and some of you will need help, “but if you don’t
hesitate to band together “and keep working at it, “you will eventually
reach your goal.” I think this class has
done an exceptional job at building each other up. When one of us saw another
struggling with something, those who felt comfortable
with it would step in and offer their guidance. We spent our lunch
break studying together, called each other after
a particularly rough day at clinical, and could
always count on each other when in need of a morale boost, so I thank my peers as well,
for their continuous support. We also, as a class, have our
clinical instructors tonight. I don’t know if any
of them are here. I think a few probably might be. We understand now, it’s no
small task to take on a student, especially in our
early semesters, when we are kind of useless. There’s no way around it, students really slow
down the work day and the get in the way
of the sonographers trying to do their job. Thankfully for us, our
instructors accepted their fate with remarkable resilience. It is thanks to their
steady determination in the face of our wildly
inefficient methods that we are here today. Their job is to teach us,
at the patient’s bedside, one of the hardest and detail
oriented roles in healthcare. I invite anyone who may
think that sonographers only take pictures to spend
the day trying to find a hole less than a millimeter wide
in an unborn baby’s heart, or to guide a biopsy
needle to a tumor less than a centimeter
away from a major artery, or to try and perform
a Doppler analysis on an anastomotic site of
a newly transplanted liver. It’s hard enough to do
those things on your own, let alone to try and
teach a bumbling student to do any of them. Yet, they did, and so we thank all of
our clinical preceptors who are here tonight
for the time they spent investing in the next
generation of sonographers. As our instructors
have said repeatedly, there is an emphasis
on the word diagnostic in our new title
for good reason. Every patient who comes to us
has an unanswered question, and our role in his or her
treatment is to help answer it. We should never take that
responsibility lightly. We correlate our images
with their symptoms, their lab work, their
medical history, and we confer with
the radiologist to
come to a diagnosis, for better or worse. The outcome’s not
always a happy one, but we take solace in the
fact that, at least now, we have an answer
rather than an unknown. There’s no better feeling in
the world when your patient, when the work you do
helps put the patient on the path for the
treatment that they need. I like to call the Diagnostic
Medical Sonography Program the hardest program no
one has ever heard of. I learned quickly
after my acceptance that when you tell people
you’re in school for sonography, you’re usually met with
either blank stares or vague nodding as the
person tries politely to pretend to know
what that means. This is especially
true if the patient does not work in
the medical field or does not live
in Charlottesville, where the program
is more well-known. The more recognized term for
sonographer is ultrasound tech, much to Elaine and
Lisa’s disdain. Apparently, calling a
sonographer an ultrasound tech is a bit like calling a
paramedic an ambulance driver. They don’t like it. We are a small group of people whose work goes relatively
unknown by others until they need it directly. We work behind the scenes. You won’t see banners unfurled
across the hospital entrance for sonography week, it’s
in October, by the way, because it usually goes
forgotten by everyone who isn’t a sonographer
by themselves. While this may sound
unfortunate at first, this lack of recognition is,
in an odd way, a comfort to me. I think this lack of
widespread celebration towards the profession
acts as a testament to the character of
the people it attracts. No one gets into
ultrasound for the glory. We are doing this
to help people. Going back to that
first day of class, when we all met
for the first time, I was struck by one last
thing about my peers. When Elaine went around the room asking why we wanted
to be in this program, not one of the 12,
unfortunately 11 now, on this stage said
that we were here because we didn’t
know what else to do or we thought it might be cool or we saw an ad and we
thought it might be fun. They all had some
kind of experience, either themselves or
through a loved one, when a sonographer
had made an impact, and that inspired them to
pursue the career themselves, myself included. You don’t often find
that kind of inspiration so consistently in one field, and that speaks volumes
for the kind of work we do. While largely unsung,
it makes a true impact. With that, I wanna
thank everybody again for taking the time
to join us tonight. It means so much that you
all are here to celebrate, and just one more moment, we wanna present some
gifts to our instructors, Miss Ali and Peggy
and Lisa and Elaine. We just have a little token
of gratitude for you all, so, Mark, you wanna help me
grab that real quick? It’s right over here. – Thank you. That’s so sweet. (applause) Well, thank you all. That was very sweet, very sweet. I would like to introduce
our next speaker, Ali Hutchinson. She is the ultrasound guru and
the world’s best cheerleader. Come on up, Ali. – World’s best cheerleader? (applause) Hi, good evening, everyone, and I’m so happy
that everyone’s here, and thank you all so much
for asking me to speak at this awesome celebration, and unlike Emily was thinking, my favorite group of students
that come to my clinical sites are the new students, because
they’re more open to learning and they’re not stuck
in their habits yet, and I really enjoy them
because, I don’t know, they’re different, but as you
get into this last semester, you know, everyone’s got
their own rhythm going and they’re taking it out. They’re running a
room, and it’s amazing. I love that as well, ’cause we can just kinda
sit back and look at what an amazing job you’re doing and how much you’ve
learned over the years, but when you’re first
starting, that’s my favorite, so just to let you know. I just wanna congratulate
the class of 2018. There are a few important
days in your life, as everyone knows, but I
think the commencements, the pinning ceremony,
and the graduation is certainly one of those days. For many years,
I’ve looked back, trying to figure out
where I was in life at the time that I graduated, and I think there’s
a lot about it that I didn’t quite understand, the feelings that I was going
through and the emotions. At first, I thought
oh, yay, school’s out. I’m done. I didn’t realize that, you know, with this career especially,
school’s never, ever done, and you’re gonna
learn every day. You’re gonna make a
mistake every day, and like Elaine said, you know, learning from it is one of
the best things you can do, but there’s so many
different opportunities in this kind of a career. There’s so many different
paths that you can take, so right now is just the
start of your future. I think that
sometimes, you know, there’s a lot of other
things that don’t make sense, just directly related
to the program, like the prerequisites
that you had to take. I know, at first, everyone
doesn’t understand what the whole physics thing
is, but I think now you do, ’cause you can definitely
understand how physics affects your images directly. You can know how to work
that machine or any machine for ultrasound, and
that’s, I think, one of the main things
when other different people or ER doctors or different
people, I won’t go into that, they learn ultrasound, they
think that they can just rub around the wand and find a
pocket of fluid or something, but you know, just understanding how physics affects the images. Now, you all definitely
understand that, looking back. So, also, some of the
assignments that you had, maybe the presentations
that you researched, I think sometimes the
presentations really help you going forward
because, for example, say you have a MSK study
or somebody has a lump, but you’re pretty sure
it’s probably MSK related, well, you learned in
class how to outline sort of like a research
project so you can say okay, I need to find out what a
ganglion cyst is, you know? What’s it caused by,
what are the symptoms that makes the patient, how
do they know they have it, and then, what am I looking for? And you can look it
up, and thank goodness, now we have the internet, if you don’t have a
research book at your site. So, you learn to do
that research in school, so now you know why, so
you can do it on the job. Everybody has the
schedule ahead of time, so you can do your research
and prepare for your patients. Never be afraid
to touch any exam, ’cause you always have
a backup somewhere. And all the lab time,
you understand lab
time and scanning. It’s like when you’re
a weightlifter and, you know, you can’t start
out by lifting 100 pounds. You have to start out
with the one pound weight, the five pound
weight, et cetera. It’s the same thing
with scanning. It’s just baby steps,
and then massive, to be able to scan
anything you want, so now you understand
why you had to spend hours and hours at
scan time, right? Yeah, yeah, that’s the end goal. And sometimes you may
have felt confused, overwhelmed, irritated. Maybe you had to
travel very far, but there’s such a
variety of clinical sites, and your teachers always
wanted to make sure that you were exposed to all the
different types of sonography, the different types
of sonographers. There’s a million of them, so all that experience is
part of why you had to travel and go to all the different
clinical sites that you did. And then, the quizzes and
the tests, oh my gosh. I know you had a ton of them, but now you understand we
were trying to make you into the best exam takers ever,
because the boards are no joke, and you know that. That’s why there’s so
many seminars and courses that you have to
pay good money to, to prepare for those courses, but you paid amazing
money to this college, and I think that everyone here
prepared you for your exams, but it never helps to
go to the seminars, but you’re prepared
to take those tests, and that’s why you have to
take those over and over, so that’s kind of a
little backside to that. Now, I know, at times,
you were wondering how you’re gonna balance family
and the relationships and be able to make
it to the holidays, the birthday parties,
things like that. Well, that’s definitely
not gonna stop as you’re a sonographer. Sometimes you have to take
call or work crazy shifts. You know, sonographers
don’t sleep, that’s just part of it, but I think your family
will grow to respect that and know that you have a job
to do, and most importantly, as you know, a gall bladder
doesn’t wait, you know? You eat that fried
chicken sandwich and you’re feeling it
at three in the morning. That’s just how it goes,
and they give you that call and you just have
to show up for that. So, this moment in time, how important is
this moment in time? It’s just so important, and
just reflecting and listening to people talk to
you about your future and how proud they are of you. You really should be
so proud of yourself, because you have just
overcome two years of intense studying,
traveling, test taking, scan time, lectures, loss
of time with your family, but you have so much to
carry away from it right now. I think that all the
stress that you have felt is important because
it helps us all grow up into more balanced individuals, and now you’re ready to move on to the next step in your life. I think, you know,
just taking a minute or more minutes or all the time to think about how
much hard work you did over the last few years, I think that, now, you know
that you deserve to graduate, just as we know that you
deserve to graduate, too. Your sheer persistence in
learning the tough subjects and all of that, you’re
gonna have an amazing future. I think you all are dedicated. I’ve seen your willpower. I’ve seen you try and
try with your imaging to get better pictures. Like I love watching, you
all are like butterflies. You’ve just grown into such
beautiful sonographers. William Butler Yates once said, “Though the leaves are
many, the root is just one,” and that’s like the
story of my life. I have, you know,
leaves everywhere, I do all these different
jobs, but wholly, my root is to do good
for the patients, and I think that knowing that, that now you’re able to
embark on this amazing career. You’re gonna be able
to support your family. You’re achieving your dreams, and you get to choose
whatever path you go on, but the root is to take
care of the patient, no matter which way you
go, which way you float off into the sonography field, you may decide you
wanted to go into Echo or some more intensive
field of vascular, whichever way that
goes, you know, you’re always gonna be
taking care of your patients. Sorry. At the same time that
you had to grow up, growing up is always tough, but you’ve managed to
make a lot of friends in this group of friends,
with your sonographers, your teachers, and I hope that
you guys all stay friends, even though you’re gonna be at different work
places and everything, because what you guys
have gone through together is gonna bind you forever. Thank you. I’m really excited for you guys. I congratulate you today. This is truly a celebration
of your achievements, and I hope that you
are feeling proud, too. Thank you to all the
parents, the teachers, and all the memories,
the mentors. This is very significant today. It marks the end of your
time together at school, but it’s not ever a
time to say goodbye. You can keep hanging
onto those relationships, and I hope that
sometime this summer, you guys do find time to relax. Hopefully, you have
a week or two off, not in between
starting your new jobs or if you’re still
looking for a job, to try to have some
fun and just relax. I know some of you
are still studying for more of the board
exams, which is fine. You can do that, you know? Laying in the sun
somewhere, you know? Sipping a mock-arita, ’cause I know that’s what
you guys like, mock-aritas. And I just hope that
you have a good, good perspective on all
the other achievements that you’re gonna achieve,
’cause I know you will. It never stops. I think maybe some of you all will write some
sonography books, right? Some fun pathology books, and maybe go to some
SDMS meetings with me and do some speeches, yeah? Yeah, I think so. So, thank you guys so much. Good luck, and this graduation day
is so important to you. Thank you for inviting me, and thank you all for your
support, and you as well. (applause) – Thank you, Ali. So, I’m gonna talk about
the significance of the pin. So, historians can trace
the tradition of pinning back to the Crusades
of the 12th century. It’s when a group
of knights tended to and cared for the injured
and suffering Crusaders. When new monks were brought
into the knights’ order, they decided to continue
helping sick soldiers, and they held a
ceremony where each monk was given a Maltese cross. That was what they
wore on their arm. Believe it or not, some
schools have decided that this tradition is out
of date and unnecessary, but I disagree. What I can promise
is it is a tradition, and not just in our field, but pretty much in
all healthcare fields. I was pinned when I
finished X-ray school many, many, many years ago, and I was pinned again when
I finished sonography school. I can remember the feeling
of oh, yes, it’s done, but I promise you, it’s not. It is, however, that
rite of passage, from being a student
to a practitioner, but being a practitioner means
bringing on responsibilities. It also means that we,
the current practitioners, trust you to enter
the healthcare field and actually perform
on your own merit. It means you’ve
passed all your exams, and you can do the job
now without our help. You are up to the
task in challenges
you career will offer, including call. You will put your patients first and yourselves last some days. It is the time to celebrate
your success and your education and begin your journey
into a rewarding career. I ask that Lisa Burrington,
our clinical coordinator, come forward to read the
dedications of the pins for the graduates, and I ask
Sylvia to also come forward. I believe she has a little
gift for you as well. As she calls out your name, please come forward
to be pinned. I must say that, in
all years passed, I’ve read the
dedications beforehand, so this year, I did not, so I’m claiming I don’t
know what’s on there, okay? So, Lisa, it’s all yours. – Thanks, Elaine. I don’t know if you’ve
ever had an ultrasound, but a lot of people
will go get ultrasounds, and then they’ll say
hey, that’s a great job, and it is a great job, but
then I’ve had so many patients say after that, they
say, God, it’s so easy. Do you have to go
to school for that? And I mean, these graduates
can tell you, it’s not easy. From the patient’s
perspective, I mean, the sonographer has a magic wand and they wave it on your body
and they get these images, and they do it pretty fast, but there’s no magic about it. I mean, these guys put
in a lot of hard work to learn how to scan, and I just wanna
congratulate them, and now it’s your turn
to make it look easy, and hopefully you all, you know, I wish that you have
very long, happy, and interesting careers, so I’m gonna read their names,
and when I read your name, you can approach
Elaine to get pinned. The first student,
Sarah Christie, she couldn’t be here tonight,
and we really miss her. I’m gonna read her dedication. “Heartfelt thanks to
my fabulous family “for their unwavering support “throughout this
long, arduous journey. “To Jen’s generous
family for welcoming me “into their midst and penthouse, “to faculty for laughing
at my lame jokes “and indulging my
incessant babble, “and to my clinical instructors, “whose patience I surely tried
to the point of breaking. “Grudgingly, I congratulate
my whippersnapper classmates, “even though they overshadow
me, clean, dirty, or edge. “Finally, my love and thanks
to Sadie and Wrangler, “my constant canine
companions and study buddies, “and to my adorable
adopted daughters, “Jen, April, and Angel,
for propping me up “more than I am
willing to acknowledge. “Thanks and congrats to all.” (applause) Angel Dunnivan. Angel says, “I would
like to thank my family “for all of their support, “Jeff and Penny for always
lending a listening ear “and a helping hand, “my children for their
patience as Mom spent “a lot of time studying, “my husband, David, for
carrying much of the load “while I was
consumed with school, “my parents, Teresa and Jay, “for supporting and encouraging
me through this journey. “I could not have done it “without each and
every one of you.” (applause) Congratulations. Austin Fitzgerald. Austin says, “I would
like to dedicate this “to my mom and dad, “for helping me through
these last few years. “I would also like to dedicate
this to Elaine and Lisa “for accepting me
into the program “and giving me a chance
to better my life. “Lastly, I would like to
dedicate this moment to my wife, “for supporting me
through the years “and being the one who believed
in me from the beginning.” (applause) – Thank you. – Mark Fountaine. Mark says, “I want to
thank my partner and family “for their ceaseless
support, encouragement, “and patience with me
during this program. “Thank you for keeping me
going through the long shifts, “late nights, and the physics. “No one should have to hear
that much about physics.” (laughter) (applause) Lindsey Harrison. Lindsey would like to thank
her family and friends for all of their support
and encouragement during one of the most stressful and exciting times
of her life so far. She would especially like to
thank her husband, Graham, who has been there to do
more than his fair share behind the scenes, with
energy and patience to spare, to be a guidepost
when things got hard and a cohort for all
the celebrations, big or small, along the way. (applause) Brandy Jones. Brandy says, “I would
like to thank my husband “for the huge amount of
support while I was in school “the past two years,
and for taking on “all of the parental
responsibilities
during this time. “I would like to thank
my boys for understanding “that Mommy had school work, “when I would have rather
been spending time with them. “Thank you, Blake, for
doing homework with me. “Thank you, Braeden,
for playing quietly “while Mommy was
doing her homework. “I would like to thank my family
for their help and support “the past two years,
especially my mom and dad “for helping to pay for school.” Congratulations.
– Thank you. (applause) – April Lacy. April says, “I would like
to thank my teachers, “friends, family, and
boyfriend for supporting me “through this journey. “Truly, none of this would
have been possible without you, “and to my classmates,
we made it. “I love you all.” (applause) Congratulations. – Congratulations. – Sarah Lewis. Sarah says, “I would like to
thank my daughter, Charlotte, “my son, William, and
my husband, Russell, “for always being there for me. “I would like to
thank my mother, “for taking care of my children,
even better than I could. “I would like to
thank my grandma, “for letting me stay
at her house and study, “and I would like
to thank McDonald’s “for great internet
and a quiet spot.” – I just like to study. – I go to Panera. (applause) – Congratulations. – Congratulations. – Side hug, thank you. – Audrey Kate Nice. Audrey says, “First, I would
like to thank my husband “for being very supportive
and understanding “of me going back to school. “You stepped in
when I needed you “and made things
easier for Gentry. “I’d like to thank Gentry
for being such a good boy, “and always making
me laugh or smile, “regardless of the day I’ve had. “Thank you to my parents
for all their support “and always believing in me. “You were always ready
to do anything to help, “and kept me awake on
countless long road trips. “Thank you to Trish for watching
Gentry when he was sick, “and I couldn’t skip
another clinical. “I wouldn’t have been able
to do it without you all.” (applause) Emily Ooten. (cheers) Emily says, “My biggest
thank you of all “is to my fiance, Robert, “who took on most of the
responsibilities at home “and financially over
the last two years. “I also thank my mom and dad “and the rest of the many
family members and friends “who have been so supportive.” (applause) – Congratulations. – Congratulations.
– Thank you so much, Lisa. – [Audience Member] Go, Emily! (laughter) – Best wishes. – Sue Puckett. Sue says, “I want
to thank my husband “and my beautiful daughter
for their patience “and support
throughout the program. “I want to thank
my mother and Jim. “Without them, this
would not be possible. “Thank you, Dad and Linda. “I love you. “Thank you, everyone, “for the encouragement
to never give up.” Congratulations.
– Thank you. (applause) – Congratulations. – And we’re on our last
graduate, Jennifer Taylor. (applause) Jennifer says, “Today, as
I graduate from college, “I am flooded with
memories of the past, “and excited about
what the future holds, “but most of all, I
think of my parents “and all they have given me, “and I want to say thank
you for your support. “I want you to know
how much I love you “and respect you for that. “I would also like to
thank my boyfriend, Mike, “for always loving me
through my darkest days “and being patient with
me through thick and thin. “Furthermore, thank
you to my family, “who is here tonight “to support and celebrate
in my accomplishments. “I could not have done this “without their love
and encouragement.” – Thank you, Lisa. Thanks. (applause) – Thank you, Lisa. There is a saying, it takes
a village to raise a child. I believe it takes a community
to teach a sonographer. I want to thank and acknowledge
all the clinical instructors that are present for
our pinning ceremony. Please stand. I wanna personally
thank you for your time that you have spent
with our students, if there’s any out there, besides Ali. (laughter) Just so you know how much time these clinical
instructors have given, it’s over 1000 hours that they
have spent with our students. Okay, and they could
not be here today without your help, your
encouragement, and your time, so we owe these individuals
a round of applause. (applause) We have so many wonderful
people in the clinical sites. It’s become overwhelming
to recognize and acknowledge them all. We do want to acknowledge
one in particular, and that was the one that we
asked to come speak today. Ali Hutchinson, I am truly
honored to give you a gift as a formal thank
you for the program and the Most Helpful Clinical
Instructor of this year, so thank you for the tutoring, the cheerleading, and
the tough coaching. (applause) We also have what we
call the Kirby Award. The Kirby Award is
given to the best, well-rounded clinical student. It’s not the student
with the best grades, but it is a student
with awesome grades, and the best in
clinical education. This year, that
student is Emily Ooten. Please come forward. (applause and cheers) So, in closing tonight, I
have some words of advice for my students of today
and those of yesteryear that may be here, I
really can’t tell, but your formal education
may be ending for some. Some of you, not, okay? You will be learning
in the next year. I want to welcome you to
the school of hard knocks and baptism by fire. It’s gonna be a hard year. You will learn more
in the next year than you have learned in
the last two, I promise. Just like in the last two years, there will be times for tears and there will be
times for jeers. There will be times you feel
like giving up, but don’t. Steven Redhead said, “The
difference between success “and failure is not giving up,” so remember, life is
like an ultrasound image. Put your focus on
what is important. Capture every detail. Record it to the
best of your ability. Remember to adjust your TGCs, your time, your generosity,
and your compassion. Those are the gifts that you
give to those around you. Not everything in
life is homogenous. People are very heterogenous. Some come into our
life as a blessing. Others come into our
life as a lessing. Treat them all with respect. Develop your image
from the negatives. When things are abnormal,
put some color on it. Stop, smell the roses, measure it, evaluate
it, analyze it, as you do the images of life. If the picture or the
plan is not working, change your angle
of insinuation. Change your plan, but
never change your goal, and as Henry David
Thoreau stated, “Be true to your work, your
word, and your friends, “and you can’t go wrong.” I’m proud of each
one of you tonight, and Lisa and I are
honored to have been some small part in your
journey to get here. We want to thank you
all for coming tonight. Please stay for the reception in honor of our pinned students. To get there, you go up the
steps, turn to the left, and follow the hall around. Again, congratulations
to the graduates, and have a wonderful night. (applause and cheers) (light pop music)