PVCC 2017 Sonography Program Pinning Ceremony

PVCC 2017 Sonography Program Pinning Ceremony


(lighthearted music) – Hello, good evening. I wanna welcome you
all to the sixth, can’t believe it,
Sixth Annual Diagnostic Medical Sonography Pinning
Program and Ceremony. The students here on the
stage worked very hard to get here tonight. This honor is not only theirs, but those who share
in their challenges to achieve these goals. Naan Russell summed
it up best tonight when he stated,
“Dreams can come true, “but there is a secret. “They are realized through
the magic of persistence, “determination,
commitment, passion, “practice, focus, and
of course, hard work.” This happens at
a step at a time, manifested over
years and not weeks. It is the hard work
over the past two years that we will acknowledge tonight and celebrate our
students success. I would like to introduce
the members of the college in the sonography program. We have Dr. Frank
Friedman, our President of Piedmont Virginia
Community College. (audience applauding) John Donnelly, Vice
President for Instruction and Student Services.
(audience applauding) Jean Chappell, Dean of
Health and Life Sciences. (audience applauding) Peggy Bizjak, Medical
Center Manager at UVA and Adjunct Faculty here.
(audience applauding) Lisa Burrington,
Clinical Coordinator for the Diagnostic Medical
Sonography program. Silvia Dowell, she
is Association of– – Alumni.
– Alumni Coordinator. And I am Elaine Nichols,
program director for the sonography program here at Piedmont Community College.
(audience applauding) Please join me in welcoming
Dr. Frank Friedman as our first speaker. (audience applauding) – Thank you, Elaine. My job tonight is pretty simple: one, to welcome you on
behalf of our college board and our faculty and staff; and two, to tell you
this is a celebration. You don’t have to be quiet. You are encouraged
to cheer, to yell, to whistle, thank you. These graduates deserve it. This is a celebration, right? So let’s start with a
big round of applause. (audience applauds and cheers)
Alright. Oh, that sounded really good. That’s the way we want it. As Elaine said, this is
the sixth graduating class, which means we’ve graduated
now about 70 individuals into this demanding field. And I’ll tell you as
somebody who lives here in this community and
sometimes needs healthcare, it’s great to know that these
folks are gonna be out there providing quality care for
all of us, including me. Graduates, I do wanna
congratulate you, obviously. But not just for
being here tonight, but for the decision you
made several years ago. You decided to seek
additional education and enter this program. I bet it was a difficult
decision, wasn’t it? Yeah. Had to ask yourself, should
I stay with my current job, should I prepare
for something new, can I actually afford this,
how will it impact my family; is it worth all the
time, money and effort? And here you are
a few years later, and I certainly
congratulate you for making that decision and having the
courage to make that decision. Now you’re in a position
to reap all the benefits. The extrinsic benefits
include a better job, a higher salary, you know, educated individuals
tend to live longer, healthier, happier lives. But just important are
the intrinsic benefits. I hope you have pride
in your accomplishment. I hope you have the
self-esteem, the confidence based on this accomplishment. And you also have a
better understanding of other people and of yourself. You’ve gained all
of these benefits due to your decision
to enter the program. So I ask you one more time, was it worth the time,
effort and money? I hope your answer’s yes, and I hope that all
of your future choices are as good as the one that
brought you here today. Congratulations.
(audience applauding) – Thank you, Dr. Friedman. Please join me in
welcoming our next speaker, Dr. Jean Chappell. (audience applauding) – On behalf of the
faculty and staff of PVCC, I also want to add my voice to
the chorus of congratulations on your success. Boy, what a success this is. Altogether now, breathe. (chuckles) What a relief. I know many of you,
for many of you, this is quite a journey, and it has not been
without struggles. Some of you are single parents, some of you have
worked the entire time while you were going to school. Some had unexpected illnesses
or family emergencies that took away a
lot of your time. But nonetheless, you’re
here, a success; you made it. And for that, you
should be proud. We have all heard the
expression it takes a village. Well in this case, it is
really very, very true. Your village community
is certainly comprised of your family, your friends, coworkers, all those
individuals that supported you in your journey,
listened to your cries, and wiped away your tears; your coworkers that
listened to the complaints, and your colleagues, your
friends, your classmates that helped you study. However, you may not be
aware of some of the other members of your
village community that are here at Piedmont, that worked quietly
behind the scenes. You know, of course,
Elaine and Lisa who worked tirelessly,
I can tell you. They’re usually here in the
morning before I get in, and they’re here
way after I leave. But there’s others at Piedmont that you may not be aware of, folks like our
registrar, Allyson Rea, or our financial aid director, Crystal Filer-Ogden. These folks were quietly,
along with the advisors and the counselors,
to set the stage for your success. This village is comprised of
a lot of folks at Piedmont who care about you,
not just as a graduate, but as an individual,
because your success really is our success. There is an African saying
that goes something like this: many small people
in many small places doing many small things can change the world. These are certainly
not small people, but the great impact
they have in your lives, through their dedication,
has made a positive impact and a very personal
impact on your goals. Now it’s your turn. Healthcare is, above all,
a service occupation. We go into healthcare fields
because we want to help and serve people, our
community or our world; the many small changes
each of you make to make these great
things happen. As you move from
student to professional, reflect on how making
just one small change can change the world, maybe
just your neighborhood, or maybe just your workspace to be a much better place to be. As healthcare professionals,
you already know the truth of what Albert
Einstein said over 50 years ago: “Only a life lived for
others is a life worthwhile.” Congratulations, again, on
the end of your journey, and the beginning of a new one. Most of all, thank
you for choosing us to be part of that journey. (audience applauding) – Thank you, Jean. I’d like to introduce
our next speakers. These are students,
these are the graduating sonography students,
Najeeb and Therese. (audience applauding) (chuckles) – It’s my hope that this
humble speech is not construed as a contrived and affected
emotional exercise, but understood as a genuine
expression of gratitude for the past and
hope for the future. I started this endeavor
four years ago, and it has been four
years of hard work and anticipation
interspersed with moments of elation and relief. There are a lot of things
we have learned in the past two or four years: we learned
about the abstruse physics of sound and how it
can be manipulated and utilized for healing. We learned a lot of
anatomy and physiology, memorized hundreds of diseases and how to differentiate
between them. And for me, the past two
years especially served to enlighten about ideas
greater than academics. Admittedly, when I first
started this course, working with patients
was a means to an end: the objective was to learn. And although the idea
of compassion was not an alien construct to me
prior to my experiences with people in their moments
of grief and personal trials, these experiences
brought me face to face with how fragile a human
being can truly become. I’m not exactly sure
when it happened, but at some point, a singular
transformative experience took place; a profound notion
of compassion overwhelmed whatever selfish desire
I may have harbored, and that became the objective. The idea of patients,
compassion and caring were redefined and nurtured with each vulnerable
and frail patient I was fortunate
enough to work with. I realized that healthcare is
not a career but a calling. But beyond the confines
of a hospital or clinic, I believe these clinical
experiences have brought a positive change in
my own personal life. I learned to see and appreciate
the manifold dynamics that define our lives: strength, courage,
celebration, life; but also grief, sorrow
and, unfortunately, death. I have become more
grateful for my good days and learned to persevere
in my bad ones. And sadly for me,
there were a few but life-changing bad ones. I was touched by moments
of personal tragedy where the idea of
quitting the program became a tempting
mechanism of survival. However, that is why
I allowed that same rekindled sense of
compassion to also reach me and realize that I
had worked too hard and given too much of
myself for the program, which, by now, is no
longer a mere program but a complete
dedication and commitment to the idea of caring. My presence here, really
having accomplished what I set out four
years ago, is a testament to the human, strength
of human will, but it’s also due to
my reliance on the idea that, no matter what
happens, Elaine and Lisa will go to great lengths
to make sure that my years of hard work
come to fruition. I want to take a
minute or so to thank our wonderful instructors,
Elaine and Lisa. And for the past two
years, I’m sure we all compare and contrasted
Elaine and Lisa in our own ways throughout
the past two years. Elaine was always
the amiable, flexible and sometimes generous, who went above and beyond
what was expected of her. To see her students succeed,
she kept our success far ahead of protocol,
formalities and legalisms. She allowed us to
have moments of levity in otherwise very
difficult program. Lisa was the quiet, observant
and sometimes stern instructor who reminded us that our
success primarily depends on our own
intellectual, personal and professional aptitude. In the end, I realized
that they both served important roles and functions, and were a great balance,
in fact, to keep us in line. I’m grateful for their
selfless and patience, dedication to our
success, and I hope they remain a team for
many years to come. Thank you. (audience applauding) – And I would like
to echo Najeeb’s expression of gratitude
to Elaine and Lisa. So the first day of
class, Elaine told us that, throughout the
entirety of our program, she could prove to either
be our greatest cheerleader or our worst nightmare.
(audience chuckles) For two years, I
have been terrified of the day when she might
become my worst nightmare. Luckily, that day
hasn’t come, yet. Our greatest cheerleader: These past two years have
been the most intense and jampacked years
I ever hope to see. My classmates and I have
learned the ins and outs of ultrasound physics,
which I don’t recommend. We have learned the
systems of the human body and everything that
can go wrong with them; there are a lot of
things that can go wrong. We have also seen the hospitals
than we ever wanted to, and to have woken up far
earlier than should be allowed in order to get there on time. And for some of us, those
sacrifices went even further with significant others and
children waiting at home. But Elaine and Lisa, our
greatest cheerleaders, have seen us through it all. They’ve given us
the tools we needed, and were always at the
ready with a life preserver in case we needed saving. Just as good teachers should, they pushed us out
into the deep end knowing that we would succeed, even before we knew
it for ourselves. Our worst nightmare: From day one, Elaine
stressed the importance of professionalism
when it came to working with patients in
the medical field. And the reason she threatened
to become our worst nightmare was because, if we were
ever to act as anything less than professional, I’m sure she would come
find us and set us straight. To help us become dedicated
and compassionate sonographers was continuously her and
Lisa’s number one priority. Will we always treat our
patients and our supervisors with the respect they deserve? Will we always say thank
you to our patients for allowing a fumbling student to practice scanning on them? Will we always keep the
patient’s best interest in mind? And at the end of it all, will we play our part
trying to save lives? These are the priorities we
learned from Elaine and Lisa as our primary instructors
during these past two years. Speaking on behalf
of my entire class, I truly believe that we
cannot have been placed in more capable hands. I’m amazed at what we
have been able to learn in the short span of two years, and it was only possible
because of the time and effort invested in
us by Elaine and Lisa. They are incredibly hardworking, and I’m pretty sure they
don’t have time to sleep. But in addition to them, we
are also well taken care of by our OBGYN instructor,
Peggy Bizjak, and her assistant
instructor, Alisa Hutchinson. The four of them together
continually show us what it means to
fulfill our calling to be the best diagnostic
medical sonographers we can possibly be. With that, this is the
part of the program where I told Elaine that
she should go with the flow, and her rebellious
students are going to hijack the ceremony. So if Elaine and Lisa and Peggy and Ali, if she’s here,
come to the front. And our class would
like to present you with some gifts to say thank you for all your hard work. Is Ali here? – Ali’s not here.
– (sighs) Okay. Someone wanna come up and
bring flowers for her? (chuckles) So we have some flowers
for all of them. (audience applauding) And Mary’s gonna take
flowers for Ali for us. (audience chuckles) And we have some cards,
we also have some gifts for Elaine and Lisa. And we have a plaque
to dedicate and– – It’s an award.
– An award, it’s an award. (audience chuckles)
– Oh, nice; very good! – These are for–
– The cake. For the cake.
– Okay. And we also have flowers
for one of our classmate’s aunt who made all
the cakes for us that we will enjoy at the end. But you don’t have to come
up on stage, it’s okay. (professor chuckles) (audience applauding) (professors chatting) – Thank you, we’re very
appreciative of that. Thank you so much. I’m gonna introduce
our next speaker. She was nominated to
speak by the students, and I’m very happy
that she accepted, even though she played a mean
trick on my earlier today: Ms. Peggy Bizjak.
(audience applauding) Alright, good evening, everyone. – [Audience] Good evening. – And most importantly, congratulations to
the 2017 Sonography Program Graduating Class. Woohoo, and you did it. (audience applauding) That’s where I need you, c’mon! (audience cheering) So this evening, I’d
like to speak to you about the acronym PPE. No, it’s not the personal
protective equipment that you put on when working
with an isolation patient, although you will
dawn that yellow gown and mask lots of
times in your career. The PPE that I’m referring
to is perspective, persistence and empowerment. And in many ways,
you will also dawn that PPE acronym with every encounter
that you have, especially with your patients
who you will come to know and care for as well
as your coworkers. Perspective is powerful; the
way you look at something affects the way you feel
and the way you act. And you know, it’s
something that we can completely control whether
you acknowledge it or not. It does affect our daily lives, so what you look
for you will find. Be aware of your
current perspective. Is it positive, or does it need a
little tweaking? So we sometimes pick
up a perspective early in our lives. And often we don’t check to see if it still works for
us when we’re adults. If you want a more
positive experience, then choose a more
positive perspective. This may involve a
huge change for us, and sometimes you
vacillate back and forth, but remember, your new
perspective will take and hold onto you, and
eventually you will start experiencing very good
changes in your life, positive changes. Need to cultivate patience
with yourself and others, and you will see a
different side of you and look at this
perspective in relations to dealing with your
patient population in our hospitals,
imaging centers and
even in nursing homes. Help others, serve others. When you enter your scan room, remember you’re
encountering a person who may be in a
great deal of pain, or someone who does
not even understand why he or she is there. Reach out, extend
a hand, offer help, which in turn offers
you the chance to step out of
yourself and understand more about others and their
needs, not just your own. Embrace other points of view, see a different side of a story, because you can all
benefit from listening and considering
other points of view, even if you don’t agree. This can give a chance
to listen and consider where the other
person is coming from. Live in the moment. I know, I’ve even been stuck, and as you get older,
it gets even worse. How your mind wanders
when there’s lots of things grabbing
your attention. But remember,
multitasking does have its advantages in
certain situations. But when someone requires
your full attention, that’s when you should
need to pay attention, and that’s usually
with your patient. Life is uncertain, of course. It can be a bit uncomfortable, especially at a crossroads
where you all are now. Just graduating,
accepting a new job, transitioning into a
new phase of your life, but gaining
perspective is the key. It often makes the
difference between resisting or accepting the new changes that are happening in your life. I encourage you to embrace
these changes fully. So let’s now consider
the second letter in PPE, which is another P, which is persistence. Your persistence as
students paid off. But keeping up with the
challenges of the program and the unique part
that each of you played in this class. Your clinical
rotations provided some interesting challenges,
like learning how to scan, how to even hold a transducer, and the art, and it is an art, of creating the
image that you desire for the reading
that the radiologist or sonologist will need. You learned how to
do this successfully. Your persistence paid off. You may not even have realized
all that has happened to you over the last few months, or several months,
I’m sorry, (chuckles) which taught you some
real-life lessons such as anything worth
doing is worth doing well. No matter what was
thrown in your path, you caught it and
you made it work. Setbacks did not derail you, and you have finally arrived. As you move forward
with a new career, no matter what happens,
there is one lesson you can take from all of this: your persistence paid. Though on this part of
the acronym I began with is E for empowerment. Right now you should be focusing
on the positive attributes that will affect
the quality of you and your scans and
all the progress of your growth. Often we as leaders sometimes haven’t done enough
to empower you, but that will be an essential
part of your success in this ever-changing and
challenging field of medicine. So here’s some tips I’d like
to suggest that you consider. First of all, learn
and build your skills. Find a mentor, that’s
very important. Join an organization
like the Society of Diagnostic
Medical Sonographers, or even from a state
and regionally plan, the VSU, which is the Virginia
Society of Ultrasound. Speak highly of your profession because it is your
chosen profession. Foster open communication
in your work life, and establish good
relationships. Maintain accountability
for yourself and your team. Smile; smile, smile, smile. Work very hard,
you’re used to that, and I’m sure that will continue. Leave drama alone. (chuckles) Most importantly,
love what you do. Make it a career,
not just a job. And remember, as a
motivational speaker that I heard once, his
name was Jay Danzie: your smile is your logo, your personality is
your business card. How you leave others feeling after having an
experience with you becomes your trademark. Be your own CEO. You are the chief
encouragement officer, you’re your own
experience officer, you’re your own chief
excellence officer, you’re your own chief
excitement officer, and your your own
chief example officer. So be the best CEO you know. To this, I welcome you to the ultrasound
community of sonographers, sonologists, radiologists,
and instructors, teachers, and even the patients that you will meet, work with, come to care about,
and help to heal. My best wishes to
you as you embark on this new journey of hope, learning, and of challenge. You can do this; look
how far you’ve come, and what wonderful
things lie ahead of you in this profession. And I wanna thank
you for allowing me the privilege of speaking to you on this important
evening in your life. Thank you very much.
(audience applauding) – Thank you, Peggy. We’re gonna talk about the
significance of the pen. To simply state what
the significance of
the pen represents, it is the rite of passage
from a student of sonography to a professional sonographer. We look back at their journey
and how they got here tonight. In the beginning of the program, the students could not
believe the quantity of information
that they must know in order to prepare
for the job at hand. Now they can discuss
disease processes, signs, symptoms,
irregular lab values, and quantify the
processes and tell you some of the treatment options for the patients
with these diseases. In the beginning, they
cringed at the word physics, but they have all passed
their physics boards. (audience applauding) In the beginning, they
would say, what do you see in that picture? And now they can
describe in detail what they all see
in the picture, and know what pictures to take and how to maximize the exam
for the patient outcome. It’s truly what they have
learned and accomplished in such a short time. However, I emphasize, this is
not the end of your learning, for everyone in medicine knows medicine is forever
changing, forever growing, and you will have a lifetime
of education ahead of you. This pinning ceremony
lets our community know that you are up for
these challenges. You are up to fulfill
those of our career. You are committed
to your profession, to your patients,
to your coworkers. It signifies that
you are professional and a role model to
future sonographers. It validates that you
understand the significance of the ethics and values
within the profession, and you will uphold
them in the future. This pinning represents
a stepping stone into the profession
of sonography. And I can congratulate you on
making it to today’s events. I ask Lisa Burrington,
our clinical coordinator, to come forward, and we
will pin our graduates. (audience applauding) – Well you’ve all
come a long way, and you should be proud, and
I’m very proud of all of you. I know that Elaine and
I are very confident that you’re gonna make
wonderful sonographers. The students were asked
to write a dedication, so as I call your name,
if you could come up for Elaine to pin you,
and at the same time, I’m gonna read the
dedication they wrote. Adriana Antezana. (audience applauding) Adriana wrote: “Trying to
find the words to express “the love and gratitude
to all who have supported, “encouraged, and
sometimes tolerated me “on my journey to
become a sonographer “is an overwhelming task. “First, I want to thank my
parents for their support “and for always reminding
me education is important. “I would also like to thank
my family, my friends, “and my in-laws for
their kind words “and support in my school. “And Andrew, thank you
for keeping me motivated “and helping me take study
breaks when I needed it most. “But truly, I couldn’t
have succeeded without “my professors and all
the clinical sonographers. “The only way I can truly
show you how much I appreciate “all you have given is to pass
it on to future students.” – Thank you.
(audience applauding) – Heidi Darley.
(audience cheers and applauds) “Justin and Tanner, thank you
for your unending support, “understanding and patience. “Family and friends, thank
you for your encouragement. “Elaine and Lisa, you helped
my stop second-guessing myself “and do my best. “Classmates, thanks for
putting up with me on this long “and, at times,
overwhelming journey. “We made it.” (audience applauding) Congratulations.
– Thank you. – [Child] Sleepy. – [Lisa] Sara King.
(audience cheers and applauds) “I want to thank my
family for their financial “and emotional support
throughout the program. “I also want to thank
my boyfriend, Nick, “for his encouragement
and his constant reminders “to believe in myself. “I am so thankful for their love “during this
journey in my life.” (audience applauding) – Therese La Fleur. (audience cheers and applauds) Therese thanks her
family and friends for their spiritual, emotional
and financial support. She also expresses deepest
gratitude to her educators who encouraged her and modeled
the integrity that is core to the diagnostic medical
sonography profession. – Congratulations.
(audience applauding) – Susan Mathew.
(audience cheers and applauds) Susan says, “I would first
like to thank my family “and my fiance for their
support and encouragement “throughout this program. “I love you all and I
would not be the person “I am today without you. “I would also like to thank
all of my clinical instructors “for everything they
have taught me.” – Congratulations. (audience applauding) – Laura Messenger.
(audience cheers and applauds) Laura says, “I would
like to thank my family “for their help and support,
my son for allowing me “to study and for
not throwing a fit “when I was out of
town for clinicals; “my boyfriend and
his parents for all “their help and support. “Also Elaine, thank you for all “of your help and
understanding.” (audience applauding) – Congratulations.
– Thank you. – Chelsea Miller.
(audience applauding) Chelsea wants to thank her
husband for his support throughout this
grueling journey, and her kids for understanding
when mommy needed to study. She wants to thank
her mom and dad for their financial support and helping take
care of the kids. “I would not have
made it without them.” (audience applauding) Najeeb Sakhizad.
(audience applauding) “I would like to thank
PVCC for providing “an accessible,
exceptional and all-around “great institution for learning. “Without PVCC’s wonderful
scholarship program, “I would not be
standing her tonight. “I’d like to thank Elaine
and Lisa for going above “and beyond to ensure
our academic and
professional success. “I’d like to thank my
family for the physical, “emotional and
spiritual support. “Without you, I would not
be able to make it this far. “Thank you.”
(audience applauding) Abby Whitlock.
(audience cheers and applauds) “I want to thank my
mom, my family, Taylor, “and Mary Jane for
staying by my side, “even when I wasn’t
always available. “This year and a half
has been hard emotionally “and mentally, and I
could not have done it “without all of your support.” – Great job and congratulations. (audience applauding) – Thank you so much. – We have two students that
could not be here tonight. Rachel Nelson is one
of our graduates, and also Laura Popov. Laura wrote a dedication
that I’ll read. She says, “I would like
to thank my husband “for always being supportive
in every way imaginable, “and our dog for never
allowing me to do my homework “with a cold lap. “I would also like
to thank my parents “for always being there
for me and instilling in me “compassion and a
great work ethic. “I would like to thank
my sister for all “the emergency
late-night physics calls, “and her family, my
brother, my in-laws “and friends for being awesome. “I would like to thank all
of my clinical instructors “for their tips and
tricks, and Elaine and Lisa “for being so patient
and understanding, “sharing your knowledge
and experience, “and pushing me to be my
best and being so flexible “for my crazy circumstances. “Finally, I would
like to thank God; “with him, all
things are possible.” (audience applauding) – There is a saying,
it does take a village to raise a child. We believe that it
takes a community to
teach a sonographer. I want to acknowledge all
the clinical instructors and sonographers that are
present at our pinning ceremony. (audience applauding) I want to personally
thank you for the time you spent with our students. Our students could not be
here today without you guys, so thank you so much. (audience member cheers)
(audience applauding) We have some truly
extraordinary sonographers in our profession, too many
to recognize individually. Every year we want to
acknowledge the sonographers within our community that
gone above and beyond with our students. I had our students
nominate that sonographer, and this year’s choice of
the Graduating Class of 2017 is Max Jackson, former Kirby
Award Recipient, Class of 2013. Is Max here? No? Okay. We’ll move on.
(audience applauding) I also want to
thank Peggy Bizjak. (muffled speaking) She is–
– Woo, thank you. – You’re welcome.
– Thank you very much. I wanna thank you for not
only giving the speech, but being a shoulder
to fall upon. – Oh, you are more
than welcome for that. My goodness, how many times
have we talked on the phone? (chuckles)
– Definitely. I also wanna celebrate
our Kirby Award Recipient for the Class of 2017. And I have a
certificate for you, Ms. Susan Mathew, come forward. (audience applauding) So, in closing, I just have
a few words for the students. This next year is going to
be a difficult one for you. We are taking away
your safety net, and we’re letting you fly away. Remember the semester you
started going to clinicals three days a week? It’s gonna be that hard. It’s gonna be that tough. You’re going to be mentally
and physically exhausted. You’re going to want to quit. I’ve told you in the
past, winners never quit and quitters never win; advice given to me by one
of my favorite teachers. Tonight, I would like to leave
you with a little message, or a poem, that I adore. This is by John Whittaker. When things go wrong,
as they sometimes will, when the roads your
trugging seems all up hill; when the funds are low
and the debts are high, and you want to smile
but you have to sigh; when all is pressing
you down a bit, rest if you must,
but don’t you quit. Success is failure
turned inside out, the silver tin to
the clouds of doubt. And you never tell
how close you are. It may be near
when it seems far. So stick to the fight when
you’re hit the hardest. It’s when things go wrong
that you must not quit. I want to thank you
all for coming tonight. And congratulations
to the graduates. (audience cheers and applauds) I want to invite
everyone around, if you go up to the steps
and go around to the back, there is a reception area. We have some goodies if
you’d like to participate. And with that, good night. (soft piano music)