Pierce College 2017 Nursing Program’s Pinning Ceremony

Pierce College 2017 Nursing Program’s Pinning Ceremony


Good evening. We’re going to go ahead and have the graduates take the stage while everyone hopefully is coming in. There’s a bit of traffic out there I’ve heard. So, we’ll go ahead and get started however we can get going with our celebration. Welcome graduates. Go ahead and have a seat. My name’s Rhonda Durano. I’m the nursing program director here at Pierce College Puyallup. I’d like to take a moment just to welcome the 2017 program graduates, Pierce College faculty, staff, administration, alumni, families, friends. It all takes all of us to get these people up on the stage and through this program. So, we’re so pleased to have you here this afternoon. First, I’d like to introduce a few people here on stage that will be participating in our ceremony today. Professor Elizabeth Webber. You’ll hear more about her later. Tiffany Smith-Fromm. Tiffany is in her second year of tenure with us here at the college, recently completed that second year. Vicki Dickson. Vicki has completed her first full-time year with us and is going to start a tenure track position this coming fall. We have Karen Winter, one of our adjunct faculty. And finally on stage I have Leslie Watts, and I’ll tell you more about Leslie as well. But she is the Pierce College scholarship foundation and one of our nursing program advisers on our advisory board. Do we have any adjunct faculty in the audience? I know Professor Glenine Collins and Natalia Loschiavo are here. Give a wave. Thank you for coming. Anyone else that I missed? Also would like to acknowledge our administrative support which is huge to this college to get this program and an event like this to happen. So Bebhinn Horrigan, our nursing program coordinator’s behind the curtain over there. Thank you Bebhinn. Eustenia Kasjan is our dedicated nursing program adviser. She couldn’t be here this evening but she has truly touched each and every one of these students as they got through the application process and the admissions process. Ron May, our dean of health and technology. And Marty Cavalluzi, president of Pierce College Puyallup, and again I’ll tell you more about him later. I’d also like to take a minute to acknowledge Jim Butler in the sound booth. He has been instrumental in getting this stage and everything ready for us for our events like this. Thank you Jim. I know many of you attended the graduation ceremony yesterday at the Tacoma dome, and that was a fabulous turnout for this cohort. That’s the most students I think I have seen go to the graduation celebration and they shined yesterday. It was a lot of fun. So you’re probably wondering why you’re here again today, crammed in another room to listen to more speeches and I just hope that you will hear us out on what the nursing pinning ceremony is all about and understand why it’s a little bit different then a regular graduation ceremony. The profession of nursing has a long-standing tradition to hold this type of ceremony to really mark the transition from a student nurse to a professional nurse. And Les is gonna tell you a lot more about that later on in the program. This year is special to me because it marks my 25th year of walking across a similar stage 25 years ago at a community college in Eastern Washington. I walked across that stage with another graduate who at the time was my fiance, and now my husband of 25 years. And so I’d like to acknowledge Giles Durano. He is a nurse practitioner, commander in the US Public Health Service, and 3 children, 4 degrees later we’re still working in nursing together and that’s been a lot of fun. His never ending support and encouragement and belief in the good that we can do as nurses continues to be my source of energy and inspiration. I know that those of you here today are the support persons in the lives of these graduates. I hope you will find this afternoon to be a personal celebration of their achievements and invite you to sit back, relax and enjoy the stories and sentiments shared. Today has been long awaited for these graduates, probably more so then any other cohort I can remember. This is my 7th pinning ceremony. A majority of the students here were admitted at the end of 2014 but due to program and structure changes at the time they didn’t start their coursework in our program until September of 2015. I know they’ve had challenges because I’ve been around to witness those and experience them right alongside them. So like any good nurse, I applied the nursing process to the situation to really analyze the problem. So my assessment: decrease lictoration in quality, increase caffeine intake, maybe some other substances too I don’t know, episodes of crying and tears, limited social interaction, weight loss or gain, in my case, ability to carry a 50 lb backpack of textbooks, the sudden urge to wear burgundy scrubs everywhere, unplanned or maybe planned pregnancies, staff changes, director changes x 2, faculty changes, not to mention the new Washington state laws related to nursing education this past year, and the computer crashes during computer… computer crashes and fire alarms during testing, that had to be fun too. So my diagnosis that I came up with: coping related to demanding nursing education process and some faculty approved interventions, administer more caffeine, monitor first lines of stress and provide referrals, provide humor with every lecture, powerpoints daily, open lab practice, intermittent group work, those relieving guest lectures, tests tests and more tests, and finally APA manuals, preseptership placements to soothe the soul and a kind Caplin instructor. My evaluation of all of this is that everything will be fine, you will make Pierce proud, and you will all pass the Enclax. So I’ve got a word for this group of students and that is persistent. According to the National League for Nursing in 2014 nationwide, about 37% of qualified applicants were not accepted into a nursing program, there’s a variety of factors with that. In 2014, our program was not able to accept 75% of those applicants. There’s just a huge demand right now so you’re looking at the 25% selected for that year. This group persisted through the admission process, the delay to start their program, the program and curriculum itself and the next requirements for RN license. I have no doubt they will continue to be successful in meeting their goals. Ladies and gentlemen, in case you don’t know this already, you are looking at a very persistent group of people. So that’s the end of my welcome and my information. There are a few seats available so if you have an empty seat and there’s a few people standing. We can get some up here. Go ahead and find a seat because we won’t make you sit too long today but it might get long. It’s my pleasure now to introduce our campus president, Dr. Marty Cavalluzi. He’s going to deliver a president’s message and our administration has been extremely busy this year. It is the college’s 50th year celebration so I think these guys have made more speeches and gone to more ceremonies and I truly appreciate him being here today and sharing a little bit with you. Thank you Dr. Cavalluzi. Thank you very much. Good afternoon. Okay, so last year I stood up here and gave a little talk and then when I walked away I grabbed everything that was under my talk, Only to see Liz Webber come up minutes ago in total panic, I mean minutes later in total panic for a few minutes scrambling where is it, and after a while I looked at my batch of stuff and thought “Oh here’s her talk.” So this year I can see she’s clutching it. It’s not gonna happen. It’s not gonna happen. Hey, congratulations graduates. I just want you to know that I am personally very proud of all of you and Pierce College is very proud of you. You’ve done a big thing. First, I want to just thank you for choosing the field of nursing, and I want to thank you for choosing Pierce College. Enrolling in Pierce College and making it through that entire gauntlet application period you heard. You just heard 75% didn’t make it through so you’re the best of the best. So you oughta be holding your heads high and thinking about that. And I also want you to…I want to thank you for just committing to the program and sticking to it all the way to the end because it doesn’t happen to everybody. It is a lot of work, right? So, and with that I just want to thank you for completing your degrees. So I just want to share with all of you who are out here, I just wanna talk about another part of nursing that I just want to remind you of, because you’ve been concentrating all the skills right? You’re just everyday study, study, study, do these skills, I got to figure this out, I’m gonna get a job. But there’s another side of nursing that I think just completes the puzzle and that’s the personal side of who you are and how you connect with patients. And I’m gonna share a personal story that 16 months ago, my son that was 12 at the time was admitted to Seattle Children’s Hospital. And what I saw in the room when I looked back from above and look, I see 2 parents who are shell-shocked who have no clue what’s going on. Our son was suddenly over exercising and under-eating, by the time a doctor figured out that he was suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and said I’m admitting your son today. We sat in the room shocked and a nurse came and checked us in and I just watched how loving she was and how she handled my son first. First and foremost the patient and then how she handled us, the parents. And when, in a moment after everything was settled I couldn’t help but kick in the administrator part of me and said “Hey, which college did you graduate from?” You know what she said, Pierce College. And that, she was all, it was a great thing. But, so thanks. But I just wanted to share that because my son was admitted for 22 days in the hospital. By the time he got in there, so he’s 5 ft 6″, 110 lb, heart rate of 25 beats per minute. You calculating all that right now? Right? So, they said he would stay in the hospital until his heart rate hit 50 beats per minute. They eventually let him out at 48 cause it just wasn’t gonna happen. But what I saw sitting there as a parent cause I stayed there for 22 days with him, I saw the human side of what nurse’s do. Not just the skills cause they excel at that but the human side of that is how they connect with every single patient and because he had a heart condition he was put in the cardiac section and so he’s in there with a lot of little babies. He was by far the oldest person in there but I’m just gonna share a few things cause I saw cause I actually lived there so late at night when I’d walk the halls I’d watch…I saw a family come in, a family of 4, they had a new infant baby underweight, born with a heart defect so open heart surgery and they can’t pick the baby up, has to just sit there. And so late at night when everyone’s gone I see the nurse’s go in and actually talk to the baby saying “You’re gonna make this, you’re gonna do this. We’re here for you.” And they connect, even when the parents aren’t there I see the way they connect. I see me laying there freezing one night cause I had no blanket and a nurse suddenly shows up and gives me a blanket. I see them connect with all the parents who are just sitting there shocked cause their kids are in the hospital and they just say “Can I get you some lunch? Can I get you some food? Can I get you anything at all? You’re allowed to live to you know.” And I just see how they care for every single kid who was in that hospital and I want to share that with you because it’s not just…it’s not just the skills it’s more then that. You know, there’s doctors and then they’re real doctors. I happen to have a real doctor who calls me on a Saturday morning and says she was having coffee in her kitchen and was just thinking about me and wanted to check in. That’s a doctor. I had real nurses who checked in constantly and after 22 days when my son is leaving, one of the nurses that’s with a patient and she looks out the door and sees my son leaving I hear her say I’ll be right back and she explodes out the door, runs over to my son and hugs him and just starts tearing up and saying you’ve done it, we’re gonna see you again I hope just out on a soccer field or somewhere. So I just want to share that cause I just…I want you to connect and think even though you’ve got all the skills and everything you’ve got to survive it’s that other side of that. Does that make sense? And eventually you’ll slow down and realize okay I can be me and show this personality and start caring, more then just the skills part. So with that I just I also want to just so I want to thank you for all of that and I want to thank you know the people here that just make it all possible, cause you’re gonna go out and you’re gonna take the ANCLEX and this program here is by far the best one in the state. We have the best pass rates in the state for the ANCLEX so thank you. So with that, I’d like to thank our nursing program director, Ronda Durano, for setting that vision. I’d like to thank our Allied Health Manager for nursing, advising and missions, Eustenia Kasjan. Our Nursing Program Coordinator Bebhian Horrigan. And of course our esteemed faculty. Liz Webber, Tiffany Smith, Vicki Dickson, Karen Winter, Glenine Collins, Natalie Loschiavo and there’s 7 other adjunct faculty in the program. I just want to thank them because I know from walking the halls with them, stopping in their offices, listening to them during meetings, they go way above and beyond. They take this stuff home with them. They lose sleep over these students. They worry. They constantly change what they’re gonna do to make sure they get what they can to be the best out there so they can go out there and nail that ANCLEX and pass the first time. That’s just…just beyond what anyone would expect so thank you all for that. Okay, so with that I just want to say graduates, just hold your heads high. You really do come from the best program in the state. Do it. Go out and nail that ANCLEX, become great nurses and I gotta say this. I hope I never actually see you in the hospital because I don’t wanna get there, but if I do, I’m gonna ask are you from Pierce College and then I’ll know what kind of treatment I’ll get. So thank you for that. Notes are safe. Thank you Dr. Cavalluzi. So at this point, we are going to introduce a couple of students from the cohort that were elected by their peers to be the speakers today in our program. Daniel Moffett. Dan is transitioning from prior career as a medical scribe and I think he plans to work or would like to work in the emergency department, ultimate goal. And then Colette Lescantz. Colette came to our program with an already established career as a midwife. We get students that have got degrees in lots of other things and they come back to get a nursing degree and I always am amazed at that. And I think Colette plans to continue working with new moms in labor or delivery, hoping for a Madigan position at Madigan Army Medical Center so I’m not sure who’s talking first but come on up. Hello everyone. Alright. So my name is Dan Moffett and I was voted most likely to be told to give a speech at graduation. Today we’re celebrating a culmination of years of hard work and dedication. When we arrived here 2 years ago, we had already been through years of required courses and made it through a pretty rigorous selection process which you heard about. So we were feeling pretty good, we were the elites we thought we knew quite a bit. Looking back, turns out we pretty much didn’t know anything. We had no idea what we were in for, and over the next 2 years it was going to be a time of intense transformation, learning lesson upon lesson, sometimes having to learn the same lessons over again. We’ve learned which patient we’re supposed to give the bowl of chili to. We’ve learned the potassium content of mashed potatoes versus baked potato. It’s okay to eat bananas if you’re on Warfrin. We learned about the healing power of potlucks and partying in the parking lot. And we learned that once a year, Chipoltle gives free burritos to nurses. I don’t know if all you people knew that. So this is all worth it. We also learned somethings that didn’t have to do with food. I think I was hungry when I wrote this. But one of the trickiest things to…for me to learn personally was being one of 2 males in a class of 20 something nursing students, so it was me and Kyle. We had to stick together. That’s right. So, there have been many moments of triumph and laughter and just as many or more moments where we were humbled. There were…there have been tears, mostly from Kyle. `But gradually those lessons in humility gave way to confidence and competence. So today we stand before you as graduates. We made it, we’re here. So, we’re full of the knowledge skills and abilities that we’ve learned over the past 2 years and now that we have learned everything there is to know about nursing and medicine, we’re gonna close this chapter and enter the new chapter as real-life nurses. A wise person once told me, “Don’t worry about it. You’ll be fine.” I’m not worried. It wasn’t very reassuring at the time but it turns out they were right. We made and we’re all here. Suck it Kyle. Hi everyone, my name’s Colette Lescantz and I’m happy to be a member of this graduating class. It’s really kind of fun to lookout today in the lobby and out here and place all the faces with the names and stories we’ve been hearing over the years. I know whose mom said you will not be a doctor, you’re gonna be a nurse. It’s pretty funny. I know the single dads who raised a couple of these girls to be strong women who are becoming nurses. It’s really fun to have the support of all you throughout the last 2 years. I’m really proud of this group. We are pretty dynamic. That is a nice word of saying persistent. And opinionated, and hard-working, and stubborn and that’s why we’re here. Most of you know nursing school is like a 2 year roller coaster ride. Maybe you’ve seen that bumper sticker that says “Get in, sit down and hang on.” For this class, I think most of our faculty would’ve said “Get in, sit down and please quit asking questions and arguing points after tests” But here we are, you know each one of us was called to nursing for our own reasons. We all have our own passion or reasons for coming to nursing. We’ve spent the last 2 years with these folks teaching us the science of nursing. But it’s the art of nursing, the art of caring for another human being much like the President talked about, on potentially the worst day of their life. You walk in that room and it’s connecting with them and taking care of them in that moment that we’ve learned and we’ve learned from each other. And I think about this group of folks and I know how hard it was to get through this program and I’m thinking “Man, we have lot’s of moms in here, Kyle’s got kids.” And then I’m thinking we have such great diverse experience and skills in this class. We have EMTs, we have a former teacher, we have military vets, we single moms…one of whom worked nights full time in this program. We have a firefighter, we have nursing assistants, medical scribes…Dan, we have moms who have kids with special needs, we have a midwife, women who are embarking on their first career and some on their second or third, we have military wives who had to cope with their husbands transferring to another state and deciding if they can stay or do long distance relationships. We all had to…they had to cope with staying here. We witnessed each other having some pretty hard transitions as well. And we’ve seen divorce, loss of a parent, we had 2 women and now 3 carry babies, give birth and then come back, you know, and keep up with their class load, that’s amazing. We have a classmate who lost her precious young son less then 2 months before starting this program. What a rich learning environment to learn a part of nursing. So you’re looking at an impressive group of graduates. Each of whom is going to be an amazing nurse, and I couldn’t be anymore proud of us. Thanks you guys. I always love to hear what the students have to say about us. So the students choose their student speakers as well as choosing an honorary speaker and often times that goes to one of the faculty members. So this year they have chosen Liz Webber, Professor Liz Webber to deliver the honorary speaker address. Professor Webber’s been with Pierce College since summer of 2012. She’s been the primary med. surg., medical surgical instructor, for the past 4 graduating cohorts. And for those of you who don’t know nursing lingo med. surg. is what the bulk of what new graduates really need to know to pass ANCLEX and survive on the job. She has a Bachelor in animal sciences from WSU that she holds and treasures which I think helps her with students…I don’t know. And after that, as many do, she went back for her Associate degree in nursing from Highline Community College and her Master’s in nursing from St. Joseph College in Maine. Professor Webber has extensive nursing experience in intensive care unit as a nurse, operating room and working in the hyper-baric chamber. She was a hospital educator for critical care and in the Cath lab for pre-licensure before she transitioned to become a pre-licensure nursing instructor. She does have a true heart and dedication to the education of our future nurses. So it is my honor to introduce Florence Nightingale’s roommate herself, the one and only, Professor…tenured Professor Liz Webber if she’s ready. You talk too fast. Hi, obviously I’m Professor Webber and as I stand here I feel like I should duck and cover because I think my name has been used in vain in many of your household, especially during testing time. So, you might be wondering why I’m wearing student scrubs, kind of wondering it myself. Sounded funnier at home. Anyway, I will reveal the real reason when I finish my speech and that will give you a little bit of enticement to stay awake, to find out. So, I’m gonna start my speech just as I do my lectures. No, not with death by powerpoint. But providing a little outline for you to follow along, and if nothing else then you’ll know when I’m getting close to shutting up. So first, I’ll begin with what it means to be a nurse, then tell you a personal story regarding yesterday’s graduation ceremony, then some sage advice, reflect on your journey, explain the scrubs and finish with a joke. Okay? Alright. Why be a nurse? So a patient…I should probably put these away…A patient once asked me why anyone would want to be a nurse. He said “That job requires dealing with non-compliant patients and broken families and dissatisfied physicians and a hell of a lot of dirty work.” And I replied, “Well, that’s the view from your side of the bed. But from my side I see the possibility of something better. To teach a new skill, to heal a hurt, and to know the comfort of a compassionate touch without a prescription.” Being a nurse is not about giving pills or charting. It’s about being able to love people in their weakest moments. So think about it, who else in your life is going to encourage you to pass gas. Alright, so yesterday I attended Pierce College’s graduation and as I watched each of the disciplines be called up on to the stage I said a prayer of gratitude for our graduates because they could’ve chosen any career. There’s so many options available to students today. Jobs that would make you more money, give you more prestige. But they chose nursing and I’m so grateful they did for all of us are better for their choice. [Applause] I once saw a cartoon, it showed an angel talking to Saint Peter at the pearly gates and the caption read, “I’m sorry I’m late but I had really great nurses.” Okay, so a funny thing happened on the way to the graduation ceremony, why I’m sharing this I’ll never know, so I was waiting in line with the other faculty to enter the Tacoma Dome and the procession and suddenly nature called. So I got out of line and I hurried over to the restroom and I was wearing that giant graduation gown and these enormous long sleeves and so I was really careful. I gathered the gown about me and I held my sleeves up and I dropped my slacks as I hurriedly peed. Well, it all went well until I went to rearrange myself and noticed that my underwear was completely wet. I mean like swimsuit wet, ‘kay. And so in my hurry I discovered that I peed through my underwear. It’s a true story. So I… [applause] Oh my god, my husband’s rolling over. Okay, so I couldn’t go back out like that but I was just stuck there with my pants down and my underwear all wet and so I threw my underwear out and I pulled my pants up and I hurried back out to the line with the other faculty and yes, I sat threw graduation commando. It was humiliating but I’m packin’ today…I’m packin’ today, good. Alright, so there’s a moral to my story. The moral is to slow down a little. It’s kind of often the smallest details of a job which are the most important. Details can prolong a task or foil an otherwise straight forward dealing, like mine, so pay attention to the smallest details because if you don’t you may just lose your shorts. Okay I’m leavin…Alright so a little sage advice okay? When Florence and I were in our second year of nursing school our professor gave us a quiz. And I breezed through the questions until I read the last one. And it said “What is the name of the woman who cleans the school?” I thought this is a joke, I’ve seen that cleaning woman several times but I don’t know her name…so I handed in my paper, leaving the last question blank, and before the class ended one student asked of the last question would count toward our grade and the professor said “Well absolutely. In your careers you’ll meet many people, all are significant. All deserve your attention and your care and even if all you do is smile and say hello.” I’ve never forgotten that lesson and I ask you guys today to remember to do the same in your careers. By the way, later on I learned her name was Edith. Alright. About your journey, as you place your scrubs on the burn pile, remember the laughter and the tears that you shared while you’re wearing them. And when you sell your books back for some drinking money, remember that your brain now possesses so much information and it’s grown because of all the brain cells you exercised everyday. And as you leave out these doors for the one last time tonight, remember that you’re part of the very special place, a place that wants the very best for you…well that and my voice to haunt you for the rest of your lives. Alright, so why the nursing scrubs? As teachers, we strive to do our best by our students, and while you were all cramming for exams I was up at midnight googling things like clotting cascade for dummies so I would know how to teach it. I wear these scrubs so I will never forget what it feels like to walk in your shoes. My job is to make myself progressively unnecessary, and that task was completed today. And though all that, through all the trials and all the tribulations that we’ve had together, you’ve made me a better teacher. You’ll see and do things in your careers that I could never have imagined in mine. I was once scolded by a physician for not getting a patient’s x-rays up on the screen fast enough for him to view. Today, images are digitalized and sent electronically to be viewed on a computer screen miles away. The world is challenging and changing so now you are the teachers. You have to continue our legacy. Teach those who come after you for truly we are all here to serve one another, but before I leave you I want to ask your forgiveness, and this is to my students. I’m sorry for the times I sighed a bit too heavily when you were answer your question, I’m sorry I rolled my eyes when you gave an incorrect response, I’m sorry I called you out in front of your peers when I believed that others could learn from your mistakes. And I’m sorry I admonished you for poor class average on an exam that you probably all studied your butt off for. The best teachers teach from the heart not from a book. I hope I’ve done that cause truly it’s been a blessing to be your teacher. [Applause] Okay, now for a joke. So an elderly man went to a doctor and had some tests done because he wasn’t feeling well, and at his follow-up appointment the doctor said “Gosh I’m sorry, the results came back and I’m afraid I have some bad news.” He said, “You have cancer and you have Alzheimers.” And the man thought for a moment and then he said to the doctor, “Well that’s not so bad at least I don’t have cancer.” Congratulations class of 2017. Thank you Liz and she really didn’t want me to mention this but this will be her last pinning ceremony as a faculty member here at Pierce College as her life has transitioned to the east coast and she will be dearly, dearly missed. She told me a story about when she went to visit one of the students at preseptership and there was a code going on. It was a student who was in an emergency room placement. A code going on and when she walked into that room there were 4 nurses in there, including our student. All 4 of those nurses were Pierce College graduates, they were all names that we knew that we had taught together and that was just so incredible for me to hear of what they’re doing out there at appreciate all your efforts in making those students into nurses. Thank you Liz. We have a couple of, one’s not listed but I do want to make an announcement about a special award and then Leslie’s gonna come up and do the scholarship presentation. Every year the program gets to choose an Outstanding Program student and this…there was a ceremony on Wednesday night, one of many, where we acknowledged and gave Laini her certificate but I wanted to let everyone know that Laini Goodlett was this year’s outstanding nursing program student…We don’t necessarily look at GPA because everybody’s got a really good GPA here but we really look at those outstanding values, qualities and attributes that would want in our graduates and Laini has just demonstrated that over and over again during her time with us. So here to present our scholarship award from the Pierce College Foundation, I’m going to introduce Les Watts and tell you a little bit about her before she comes up. Leslie has served this college for a number of years. She has a bachelor of science and nursing and a master’s of education and guidance and counseling from PLU. She served as a college health nurse, a nursing adviser, mental health counselor and has oriented new directors and faculty over the years. She is also a retired colonel in US Army Nurse Corps. She wanted a program…a nursing program here at Pierce College for a long time and was instrumental in the creation of this program, and I think this is your 11th pinning ceremony that you’ve been able to join us on this stage. Retired now but I think busier then ever as most retired people are. Currently she’s doing musical theater and has a lead role in the 9 to 5 musical and has a performance tonight so we really appreciate her being here this afternoon. She’s gonna present the scholarship, tell a little bit more about as well as the history of the pinning ceremony and we’ll move into that afterwards. Leslie Watts. Thank you Ronda. It gives me great pleasure to be a representative of the Pierce College Foundation which is the fundraising arm of the college and one of the things of one of my duties as part of the foundation board is that I am the Chair of the scholarship committee. We had many fundraising things. We had a huge, huge fundraising Gala that celebrated our 50th anniversary a couple months ago and it is because of the generosity of the people who are graduates and our community that we are able to fund scholarships for our students. And so because of this, for the last couple of years, the foundation board has been able to award scholarship assistance for every single class member of this Pierce College nursing class to help out with their expenses this last spring quarter so we are privileged to do that and I wanted to have you acknowledge and know that that’s where all that all came from because people don’t know that on top of tuition and books there’s all the gas to get to your presceperships, there’s the child care, there’s all of these extra expenses that people don’t really know about but I’m hoping help to relieve some of that financial stress. The other tradition that started is that over 10 years ago when we started the nursing program, as Ronda said I was privileged enough with Dr. Joanne Mossari who was the first director of our nursing program and founder and putting together the whole program. Joanne is now in a leadership position down at a university in…down in Oregon but there has…there was a legacy a few years ago where a scholarship was established in Joanne’s name and every year this scholarship is then awarded to a member of the graduating class who plans to go on for their BSN, and so this year, on behalf of the foundation, I am happy and pleased to award the scholarship to Pamela Mattson. That’s my name. Yes, that’s you. So Pamela plans to go on for a bachelor’s degree and that’s gonna be at…you say that. WGU… At WGU which is Washington Governor’s University, and it’s an online program which will allow Pamela to be working and still working on her BSN as well so this is your certificate. I’m all shaky now. $500 award sent directly to the university by the Pierce College Foundation for payment, tuition or other related costs. Thank you so much. Okay, if you’ll see on your agenda…on your program, we’re moving right on to the history of the pinning ceremony. So a lot of you are probably wondering, I mean afterall you just went to commencement yesterday at the Tacoma Dome and you gotta stick around for another function, well you know what is all this about? Well, the pinning ceremony actually is an opportunity, as Ronda said, to bring family and friends, and really you guys this is the last time you are all officially together, celebrating the achievement of finishing your nursing program. And…and I see out here a room full of people with happy tears in their eyes supporting a loved one who has spent the last 2 years completely dedicated to earning a nursing degree, and this pinning ceremony is where newly graduated nursing students are presented with a special nursing pin from the faculty as they are welcomed officially into the nursing profession. The nursing pinning ceremony is all about honoring and celebrating nursing students and their journey to become a nurse. After all the passed tests, exams, clinicals, prescepterships, it’s finally here. Your pinning ceremony. And people are wondering so where did this even start? And actually for you who have and enjoy a little history, goes back to the Crusades of the 12th century when a group of knights tended to and cared for injured and suffering crusaders. When new monks were brought into the knight’s order, they decided to continue helping sick soldiers and held a ceremony where each monk was given a Maltese cross that they wore on their arm. Fast forward to the 1860s, when Florest Nightingale was honored with the Red Cross of Saint George for her selfless efforts to injured men during the Crimean War. After starting the first formalized nursing school and because she believed in acknowledging a job well done, she presented a medal of excellence to her hardest working nursing grads. By 1916 however, it became a standard in the United States to know longer just honor a few nurses with the Medal of Excellence but instead all of the nursing grads with a pin during a special ceremony just for nursing students. The pin is designed to identify the school of nursing that each student attended. It identifies you officially as a nurse and proof that you got educated. Our graduate nurses in the past used to wear the pin on your lab coats and if you’re in a clinical situation where you can you wear it your lab coat or a lot of them just pin it right to their lanyard. But these days, as our nurses wear scrubs, they’re a few people that even go to some of these embroidery shops and have our logo, the pin logo embroidered on your scrubs so you can still proudly show our pin logo. So that’s up to you…hint hint. And so, without further a do with this right of passage I now turn this back over to Ronda as we continue the official pinning of our nursing grads of 2017. Thank you Les. So the faculty will be taking turns giving their…the pins to the students so without further a do come on up faculty. Full-time faculty and then I will be reading their names as they come up on stage. They know where to stand for their photos. Don’t forget that. Elisha Bigayan Sydney Anoko White Brown Dionna Burgis Stephanie Carlson Whitney Couture Krista Dullanty Kyle Engol It takes a while to get a pin… Kyla George We’re doing the lanyards cause we don’t trust ’em with sharp objects. Amy Marie Gocha…and baby… Laini Goodlett Kelsey Hamilton Brandie Hinzman April Lazara Colette Suzanne Lescantz Pamela Mattson Daniel Moffett Tiffany Neil DeAnn O’Leary Illene Plaster Giesleydi Nichole Portelles Annie Manglona Reyes Rachel Robinson Maria Salas Sadelle Shevlin-Bennett Gisllene Mendes Shin Jessica Tallariti Olivia Tamburello and Cassandra Abagayle Watkins Let’s give these graduates one more big round of applause. Our next piece I’m gonna let Les explain as well. We’re going to be doing a candle lighting which is also one of the traditional parts of a nursing ceremony. And right after the candles are lit the students will be led in the nursing pledge which is on page…the next page of your program if you want to follow along while they’re reading that. So, go ahead Les. So as you see that the center of attention in our Kodak moment spot, it has a big lamp there, and no this is not a Alladin’s lamp, this is the lamp of knowledge and it’s the official symbol of the nursing profession and of higher education. The inspiration for the traditional symbol of the nursing profession, this lamp of knowledge actually came from the lady with the lamp who is Florence Nightingale, a title that she got back between 1820 and 1910 and was founder and considered founder of the nursing profession as her life was dedicated to all phases of nursing. And early in the Crimean War, that I referred to before, the deplorable facilities for the care of the wounded were very, very evident. And under the direction of Florence Nightingale, a small staff of nurses went to Scatari, near Istanbul in Turkey. And within a few months, the military hospital boards were clean and efficient. Florence Nightingale was known as the lady with the lamp because she made her rounds by the light of the lamp that she carried. Today, this now stands for the lamp of knowledge that as nurses. She started the nursing profession, or started officially teaching nursing in schools and that has now a legacy that’s been passed down generation to generation to generation. And I want to insert I’ve found this online from another pinning ceremony that was just last week at another university, and I loved it and I wanted to share this. Today our world needs healing and to be rekindled with love. Once Florence Nightingale lit her beacon of lamplight to confront the wounded Her light has blazed a path of service across a century to us. Through her example, and through the countless nurses and healers who have followed in her footsteps, today we celebrate the flame of Florence Nightingale’s legacy. Let that same light be rekindled to burn brightly in our hearts. Let us take up our own lanterns of caring each other, in our own ways, to more brightly light our own paths of service to the world and to more clearly share our own noble purpose with each other. The candle lighting ceremony represents the learning process that all of you have gone through, valiantly for the past few years. And in fact, I’m not sure if I quoted this last year too, it is in the Guinness Book of World Records that the curriculum in a nursing program is more arduous then engineering school. Documented. So right now, with our lamp of knowledge as a centerpiece, our director Ronda Durano is going to go down and light her candle from the lamp of knowledge. She will then pass this on the nursing faculty, who will then go over and pass it on to you as they have during the last 2 years. Alright, you ready? Alright, I’m gonna say the pledge. As a Pierce College Nursing Graduate, I solemnly swear to myself and my fellow nurses that I will uphold the duty of the registered nurse to the best of my abilities. I will treat each patient that comes under my care with the same dignity, care, and compassion that is deserved to all; whether that means helping bring a life into this world, or giving comfort as a life leaves this world. I will never show prejudice towards a patient, and I will always respect their culture, religion, and choices. I will always do what is in the best interest of my patient as a patient advocate, even if I do not agree with a medical decision. I will give comfort and care to both the pateint and families in all stages of care. I will always strive to give the best care with confidence without delay. I will work in a professional manner and as a member of the health care team. When placed in a leadership position, I will grasp it with eagerness and set the best example for those around me. I will follow the law and code of ethics set before me, and above all else, I will remind myself everyday why I became a nurse. I will strive to be the best nurse that I can be, always, and show leadership for others to emulate. So you can be seated. Turn your candles off. And now Pam and Kyla have a special presentation they’re going to do. Okay. Alright. Hello family. So what would nursing students be without their professors? Oh can you hear me now? I have a soft voice. Okay. So what would nursing students be without their professors? Students. So, we’re here today to present some gifts. Some of them are still coming. They’ll be here soon. But we also wanted to take a moment to honor each of you. And this is not turned on…So Professor Smith-Fromm, your first day was our first day and we’ve been through a lot with each other…Sorry, nervous. Okay. So you’ve taught us a lot. The first thing and this has been gone over, it’s been said a few times, we’ll carry this forever but we’ll be fine, we’ll always be fine. I’m not worried about you, I’m not worried about any of us because we’ll be fine. And then the second, and this has been mentioned earlier too, excellent sources of potassium, we love potassium. Yeah the potatoes. Not a quarter of a sweet potato but a whole baked potato. We trust sweet potatoes. Yeah. So, Professor Dickson, we would like to thank you for your patience, even when we nearly gave you a stroke after a dosage-calc test. I know you were a little worried about us that day. For going above and beyond in lab and repeating demonstrations that we asked for 50th time if you could show us one more time because we’re nervous for check-offs. So just again, and again after that. For always taking the extra time to hear our concerns and our proud moments during lab, during clinical, outside of the classroom…you taught us with such patient and kindness and we appreciate you dearly for that. Okay. So Professor Webber, tpw, we would like to thank you for your patience, even when…that’s the wrong line oh my god… So, first I’d like to say all of us, because we heard this up until last week, you can’t fail us now, not anymore I think but we’re gonna…you can’t. They’re not in…okay you still can. That’s good. Yeah, so we wanna just thank you for everything you’ve taught us cause its been a long road for all of us. You know, we got to keep you and we finished this…we finished this together, and we couldn’t have done any of this without all of you. And you pushed us each week with lecture, with powerpoints, with the exams which you have all seen the tears I’m sure, we remember. And the history lessons, our wonderful history lessons with Florence Nightingale. You’ve heard a lot about Florence Nightingale tonight, we’ve lived Florence Nightingale for the last 2 years. She’s our lady, Florence. We will forever cherish you and it’s gonna be hard not to have you…you know, it’s gonna be hard to have you across the country even when we’re out on our own journey. But the biggest, one of the biggest lessons that we will take from you and I know all of us can agree, is the Florence Nightingale quote, “I attribute my success to this. I never gave nor took any excuses. And we are not a group of excuse givers, we are doers, we are carers, we are nurses. Thank you. Now, Director Duranno, on our first day of lab I remember as we sat nervous and excited in our seats, not knowing what to expect, you talked to us about prioritization and balance in our lives, and that this is what we would need to get to this day right here. That was our first valuable lesson from you. That first quarter we knew you as Professor Duranno, not Director Duranno, but when the need came you stepped up and took the position as director and we are so thankful and grateful to you for doing that. For those of you sitting in the audience just know, and you can ask them about it later, that you are our non-negotiable golf balls. It’s a big deal. And these 4 individuals are not alone in making these graduate nurses that you see today. The following staff are our wonderful adjuncts, have contributed just as much to our success. So I would like to read their names to acknowledge them. Some are here today, some are not. Lets see, there’s Cathy Elder, Kristina Hansen, Mattie Brickle, Lindsey Nelson, Natalie Loschiavo, Karen Winter, Glenine Collins, Denise Garcia, Jack Keith, Hannie Yu, Eustenia Kasjan and Bebhinn Horrigan. Thank you. Professor Winter, we will forever know what it sounds like when a woman is about to actively push. We will never forget. There is one more person that our cohort would like to thank for all of her hard work and dedication and that’s Kyla right here. Kyla was the president of our Rainier nursing club. She came back to campus after nights of class when the rest of us were studying and she needed to do the same to attend faculty meetings to bring up concerns that we had and advocate for us so thank you Kyla. Our cohort has put together gifts for each of you that we would like to present to you personally afterwards. We have a display here but we would like to make sure everyone can get in on thanking you and presenting them afterwards so that’s it. Thank you. Oh yes. Go get a job. Thank you Pam and Kyla. Much appreciated. Well this really concludes the speakers, yay. We’re gonna switch a little bit from the order in your program because the students have prepared a slideshow and they would like to watch it too. And the way we’re set up, we’re going to bring a screen down up front so I’m going to have the students go ahead and exit to the sides just like we practiced. When the slideshow…one second, when the slideshow is done the house lights will come on and that will be the end of our program, you are more then welcome to please join us in the lobby for some refreshments and lots of picture taking I’m sure. Thank you all so much for coming tonight and for celebrating these graduates’s successes. Thank you. Now you may exit.