MTG – Great Gift Ideas for Magic: The Gathering Players

MTG – Great Gift Ideas for Magic: The Gathering Players


Oh, hello! I didn’t see you there. You know, many friends and family of Magic the Gathering players ask the question: “What are some awesome gifts to get for Magic the Gathering players?” Whether you play Magic or not, getting an MTG gift for someone who does can often be tricky, as Magic is such a personal game and experience, that if you don’t expertly know your friends collection, and decks, then buying the individual cards They might really want is going to be hard. Not to mention expensive. Sure, you can buy a bundle or other boxed product, but these usually amount to little more than a big pile of booster packs and, while players love packs, it lacks that personal touch we often strive for when giving a gift to the people who matter in our lives. Presented here are my suggestions for great gifts you can give to the magic player in your life. I’m sure your friend, son or daughter will find them “way cool” and consider you to be a “radical friend” or family member! * whispers into ear *
Uh huh… uh huh… uh huh… I understand completely. I’m now being told that the correct terminology is “fleek” and “lit”. Please make a note of it! Let’s begin with a Battle Box. Want to make your Magic the Gathering friend’s head explode with excitement? Consider the personal touch of giving them a Battle Box. I’m going to show you how to make one, even if you don’t know how to play Magic, and also three different pricing levels to accommodate most players. First, let’s begin with; what is a Battle Box? A Battle Box is a collection of Magic the Gathering decks that are pre-made and ready to battle against one another. Ideally, a battle box has six decks, although some can have as few as four, or as many as, well, I’ve seen some enthusiasts go nuts and make 10, 15 or even 20 deck Battle Boxes. I’ll recommend 6 to start with. If you give your friend the gift of a Battle Box you are giving them the ability to pull out a Magic the Gathering deck that they can play with their friends any time again, and again. If they have friends who no longer play or, friends who don’t play the same format, a Battle Box gives everyone the materials and even playing-field they need to start with. Multiple friends can pull out multiple decks. You can sit down to have a great melee game or pair off for multiple rounds. I recommend buying an Ultimate Guard Stack and Safe to house your battle box. A high-quality deck box priced at only $9.99, you can’t go wrong and presenting your gift in this clean, compact and cool-looking case is a great start. Once you have your four to eight decks, sleeve each one using different colors. The two best brands are currently Dragon Shield mats and Ultra-Pro Eclipse sleeves. As for which of those two is best, that is another video, which you can find here if you’re interested. Okay, so that’s your Battle Box case, your Battle Box sleeves. What decks actually go in the battle box? If you think I’m going to recommend Standard or Modern decks, then you are what professionals like to call cuckoo-crazy. Six standard decks? Yeah! I don’t have $2,000 to drop on a gift for myself, let alone a friend. Six Modern decks? Well, sure, I could sell my car, but then I’d still need four more decks. No, there’s better ways to build Battle Boxes with decks on different budgets and still get amazing gameplay. I’m going to go over three tiers of pricing that I think will be reasonable to most players. Suggestion one, the most expensive but my personal favorite, is to use Championship Decks. Championship Decks, as I cover in more detail in my video here, are official proxy decks where the top eight decks of major Magic events were printed on real Magic cards, only with gold borders and different backs so as to distinguish between tournament legal cards. Building a Battle Box with four to eight of these creates one of the best Magic experiences you can have. Sitting down with an Ultimate deck to play against another Ultimate deck, all from the comfort of your kitchen table. These are an awesome product that everyone loves, and thus they are no longer made by Wizards of the Coast. So, you’ll have to look on the secondary market for them. Prices are high because of limited supply, and the fact so many people want them and, thus, they tend to go for roughly about thirty to fifty dollars each. I’ll show you cheaper options in a moment, but one thing to note is that since these proxies are so prized there are many decks being sold for a lot cheaper, with just the cards played in Cube taken out. So for example, you can find one for a lot less only it’s being sold without its Gaia’s Cradles in it. Snap that deal up friends, because you can just use the included blank proxies to write Gaia’s Cradle on it and get the same effect. Hey, Wizards doesn’t want to reprint or sell the originals? Sell the proxies, or sell anything like that then whatever. You’re playing at your kitchen table anyway, so there you go, not your fault that they literally won’t take your money. Suggestion two; Pauper decks. Pauper is the best budget format. A kind of Legacy-light that is filled with a wide variety of decks and styles. You can watch my detailed video on what the Pauper format is here, but a Pauper Battle Box is affordable, high-powered and fun. Best of all, while most complete tier-1 Pauper decks are thirty to fifty dollars, just like the championship decks, there’s many variants and barely powered down versions floating around for under 30. Some even in the ten dollar range. You can check out my own Pauper deck texts the listing of tournament winning decks at MTG Goldfish or famed Pauper player Alex Ullman’s Pauper articles to get ideas for the four to eight decks you might want to build for your battle box, all of which I will list in this video’s description. The final deck option is ultra budget, and while not as powerful as championship decks or popper decks it still offers extremely well crafted, interactive and balanced Magic gameplay, at an incredibly low price. And that of course is just buying some battle decks for your Battle Box. I’ll be brief because I cover these extensively already, but the battle decks are only $9.99 each, and they are complete 60 card decks designed and engineered by legendary Magic player, and current game designer, Chris VanMeter and based around popular draft archetypes. Filling up a Battle Box with $9.99 battle decks is the most cost effective way to go. But no matter how much, or how little you spend, giving the Magic player in your life a Battle Box means you’re giving them one of the best possible gifts of Magic the Gathering. Moving on, another great Magic the Gathering gift is the gift of… what’s that say? Books?! What, like those analog versions of webpages? They have those for Magic? Huh. There’s a wide variety of Magic the Gathering books available, each with their own wide variety of topics. From highly advanced gameplay skills and strategies meticulously outlined by the legendary player Patrick Chapin in his ‘Next Level’ series, to a rich, detailed narrative of the history of the game, and it’s professional level play in “Generation Decks” by Titus Chalk. There’s the four hundred page text book on the gameplay and tactics of the now banned vintage deck ‘Gush’ by famed player Stephen Menendian or the detailed building and playing of vintage Eldrazi in ‘Eldrazi Meditations’ by Jason Jaco. For something a bit lighter, the dry wit of the Magic the Gathering comic book collection of ‘Cardboard Crack’ will suffice. Any of these Magic the Gathering titles offers a different and desirable magic gift for the player in your life. Ah, but why buy a 400 page book, when a single picture is worth a thousand words? One of the best things that you can get is a Magic the Gathering art print. Magic the Gathering prints are one of my favorite gifts to give because they are one of my favorite things to buy. When I took my hiatus from Magic the Gathering all those years I went without playing, I still constantly, almost nightly, thought about the game. But it wasn’t the rules, or the interaction and mechanics that I thought of. It was the artwork itself. Finding Magic the Gathering art can be a bit of a search. Artists come to GP’s and other MTG events to sell their prints in person, but you can also order an enormous amount of MTG art online. Just type the name of your favorite Magic artist into Google, and see if they have an online web store. If so, you should be able to buy signed prints and sometimes other items like play mats from them, and have it shipped to your door. What a great gift! I’ll list some of the Magic artists websites I know of and use in this video’s description, but don’t hesitate to poke around. Sometimes just finding an MTG artist on Facebook and Twitter is all it takes to message them, asking if they have prints available for sale. A great collective of many Magic the Gathering artists is the original Magic Art Online store, which has different sized high-quality prints from such a wide variety of artists new and old. That’s where I finally found… my inspiration. This seemingly ‘meh’ card has the artwork that I used to represent my channel when I first began it. That ‘aha!’ moment. Depicted, here, is what I associate so strongly with what I want to do, and be, about, and I couldn’t ever find this print until at last the artist put it up for sale on the OMA Store. OMA also has a variety of other stocking stuffers, from play mats, to tokens, to specialty items like the relics of wizardry which are a hundred percent metal coins usable as counters and status markers for Magic the Gathering. Fun and fancy ways to create treasures, signify a creature is embalmed or exerted, or just as a plus-one plus-one or negative-one negative-one counter on it. The website as a whole is a great resource for looking for Magic gifts. Next is a more expensive gift, but probably one of the most memorable. A custom, specialty decked box. Whether you want to give your friend the gift of a deck box that is a piece of Magic the Gathering come to life, like a Hedron or Ratchet Bomb… or you want to offer them the superlative craftsmanship of wood and mastery, well there is nothing like offering the work of Aaron Cain custom boxes or leaf kicker. I mean, there’s nothing too personable about buying an MTG friend a Satin Tower or Ultimate Guard Flip and Tray, as these are mass-produced items available in every store. But an Aaron Cain custom wooden deck boxes, made to order and crafted to your specifications. What wood would you like? Inlay?
Flocking or no? How large? Do you want it to be for a single sleeved Pauper deck with room for 20 tokens? Or large enough to hold a cube? Aaron Cain will craft what you want, when you need it, and how you want your box to be, like no other. Price is not cheap, and the time to produce is not short, but you are buying a deck box for life. With Leafkicker you are literally getting a solid acrylic piece of the game. As though Magic has come to life. Hand cast and hand-painted, these are some of my absolute favorite deck boxes. Period. As nothing gives me more joy than opening my Leafkicker ‘Sensei’s Divining’ top or ‘Ratchet Bomb’ as I sit down to play Commander. We’re pulling out sig from my Arran Cain crafted wooden deck box. Contact and ordering information is available in this video’s description. I hope very much this video has been of some help to you! You can help me out by remembering to like, share, subscribe, or even just by leaving a comment. What do you think is the best Magic the Gathering gift to give to the MTG player in your life? Let me know in the comments below! And this video is brought to you by my, and many other people’s local games store; CardKingdom. A brick-and-mortar pillar of this community. As well as the Patreon support of viewers, such as you. These are the people that keep Tolarian Community College going, and growing strong. So thank you!