Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey – Experiences: The Climatologist

Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey – Experiences: The Climatologist


The way our brain functions and the way we think is changing with every generation Woah move! Move your character! Run run run run! I tried… Oh… We are constantly evolving. It’s just… it’s not flashy. It’s not like “hey my head’s got twice as big”! Okay. It’s not like that. You have a really interesting background because
you studied the evolution of Men on this planet but you also studied climate. I started off doing physical geography at university, went on
to do marine geology and started off looking at past climates This is what I wanna see… Because that’s a clan. And then, I got a family. And a dear dear friend
of mine said to me did I want to work in Africa? Shorter periods of time. I was only going to be on field work for two weeks at a time and then we started our whole African project about twenty years ago. So who are you Abbie? I’m the daughter of Mark Maslin. Maybe you can try to help her out because you played a little bit. But don’t listen to anything he says because he’s not really good. And what do you think would be the biggest trigger for evolution? It’s all about the change of environment and the stress. At the beginning of your game, you have this beautiful rainforest. And that’s what would have been in Africa about 10 million years ago. It was flat, lots of forests, lots of diversity… Woah… Oh… Yeah… You went a bit like “let’s jump!!” And then, what happens is that there was a hotspot and it rises up very slowly. The way I explain it, it’s a bit like making an apple pie… So the apple sauce, that’s the magma. You then put the beautiful crust over the top and I’m a bad cook. So you leave it in too long and it rises up beautifully and then it cracks and forms one big crack… All the apple sauce bubbles out And that’s actually the African Rift Valley. So the whole of the Rift Valley fills up with water and then it disappears. And it’s that stress of suddenly having a wet environment, so like this and then suddenly this all being taken away The most important thing I think for brain expansion is when the lakes disappear they don’t go straight away. They die and they expand. They die, expand… And it’s about two thousand years before they actually finally go. Look around. No, that’s your dead mother. Ohh… The most important thing about being human is our brain is incredibly flexible I go in the brain and I can upgrade my character. This is everything that I’ve done prior to this moment and so before you change generation, the more babies you have
the more knowledge you can actually lock through a generation And then pass it on Oh that is so clever! So… in our childhood most of the neurons are not connected. And it’s the environment and it is the stimulation and the society we
get born into that locks in all the neurons It takes fourteen to fifteen years before we can start to function in society. Now you have to let go at the right time Ah! Now you’re bonding with that character. Let go. Yes! Now the interesting thing is… Because our progress is going so quickly our children are already in a completely different world and environment to us. It’s almost like each generation is a completely different species. This is my excuse for not understanding my children. Their just a different species. Their a bunch of teenagers, I don’t understand them. The science in it is brilliant. The way they actually think about it. The way they’ve
actually read our work and actually then said : “Well hang on, what do they really mean?” Evolution is like this sort of chaotic… random… You have to find things, you have to be curious. All of this. And that, he’s encapsulated, I think, better human
evolution than any of the science text that I’ve read. And were you afraid when you were in Africa? Humm… No not really. I was more scared playing the game when they would jump
out at you than being in Africa. It’s quite scary.