Allonzo Trier’s Rookie Year Reflection | The Players’ Tribune

Allonzo Trier’s Rookie Year Reflection | The Players’ Tribune


– We all remember the reason why we started playing this game, when we were young kids. – Hi, Allonzo. – Hi. – O.K., go. – Yay! – When I was eight years old I told my mom the only
thing I wanted to do was focus on playing basketball. I made that vow to dedicate
myself to the game. It hasn’t stopped since then. Growing up as a kid, I
was a little bit shy, very to myself. But I was very ambitious about things that I liked. If I saw something I wanted to do I put my all into it. And that was the game of basketball. Basketball was something that I felt at ease with when I was playing. No matter what was going on in my day, when I was on the basketball court it was something that
allowed me to feel free, and kind of make all my problems go away. The draft was one of the worst, most disappointing nights of my life. I don’t know what they overlooked in me. I don’t know what they didn’t see. I knew what I was capable of, I knew where I belonged. And I believed in myself. I remember, the draft ended. I went home – I went to my hotel. And then I texted my agent and I said, “Find me a gym in the morning.” And I went to work. – Is that your mom over there? – Yeah. – Yeah? Which one is she? – That one. – Yeah? There she is. – My work ethic started at a young age. It was instilled in me by my mother. She taught me what it would take to try to pursue this. Not only did I have to
make the sacrifices, but my mother did also. Whether it was taking me to the gym to work out, rebounding for me, taking me to my next practice
– she did the best she could to be my mother and
father tied all into one. Never really told my
mom I was gonna make it, but I knew like … I worked
too hard in order not to. It’s the hardest you work. I just wanted her to know
that it was worth it. As people we’re all constantly evolving, striving to get better at what we do. A lot of people say like, “You just go into a gym and work out for a couple of hours, leave, and you’re done.” But it’s so different than that. From film work, to getting shots up, to working on ballhandling, I still need things I need to know. Part of who I am is being able to adapt and deal with change – being able to be uncomfortable and then finding your way. I think that the kid
in me would think like, “Wow, you stuck it out. You’re incredibly dedicated.” I think he’d be proud.