2016 Cuesta College RN Pinning Ceremony

2016 Cuesta College RN Pinning Ceremony


(“Learning to Fly” by Tom Petty) – Congratulations nursing class of 2016! (audience applauds) Today we celebrate your
accomplishment of becoming a nurse. Earning a nursing degree involves much commitment and hard work. It is an achievement
worthy of great honor. Let’s reflect on the
events that got you here. In October 2013, you
submitted your application to the Cuesta College Associate Degree Registered Nursing Program. You, and 209 other applicants. On February 14th, 2014, you
received official notice that you were one of
the top-ranking students selected to enter the Cuesta RN program. You are a very bright group. Coming in with an average
prerequisite science GPA of 3.65. That’s an average of
an A- in microbiology, physiology, and anatomy. Three of you were LBNs that
were given an educational and work experience credit
to enter the RN program in the second semester. On June 4th, 2014, you
attended the mandatory incoming student orientation
where you learned how to prepare for the full-time,
rigorous, and demanding nursing program. On August 18th, 2014, you entered day one. Over the past two years,
you have remained positive, focused, dedicated, and determined to master the RN curriculum. And that brings us to today,
Friday, May 20th, 2016, the day we celebrate your
completion and graduation from the Cuesta RN program. Each of you have grown
intellectually, professionally, and personally. You have completed the
required 470 theory hours in the classroom and
the 1,053 clinical hours to qualify you to sit for the national licensing exam and be employed as an RN. You have been educated in the
art and science of nursing, and along the way have
learned how precious and unpredictable life can be. You have earned the trust and
been given the approval to be a nurse by myself and
the very qualified nursing faculty behind me. As an RN, you will touch
and change the lives of every patient you encounter, even during moments when you are unaware. Do this with the knowledge
and respect it commands. Practice with caring behaviors, promote wellness at all times, demonstrate honesty and
integrity in all actions. We welcome you, our community,
our families, and our friends to one of the most incredible
milestones in each of these soon-to-be RNs’ lives. They have earned individual
grades in nursing school, but they have not done this alone. Every one of you in this
room has helped them. We would like to take
a moment to thank you. Without all of you, we
would not be graduating these 39 bright, caring,
motivated students today. Will the spouses,
boyfriends, and girlfriends, and significant others, please stand. (audience applauds) We thank you for giving us your loved ones for the duration of nursing school. They are eager to be
able to relax and enjoy the finer things in
life with you instead of nursing faculty and textbooks. We thank you. Will the parents and
grandparents please stand. (audience applauds) We thank you and want you
to know that your children and grandchildren appreciate
all the love and support you have given them, be it financial, a should to cry on, or someone to say, “We love you and we are very proud of you for everything you are doing.” We thank you. Will the children of these
graduates please stand. (audience applauds) Your moms and dads can’t
wait to hug and hold you, walk with you and have ice cream with you, minus the guilt that
they should be studying for another test. We give them back to
you, and we thank you. Will the aunts, uncles,
cousins, friends, and neighbors, please stand. (audience applauds) Your relatives and friends are back. They are ready to give you
off-the-cuff nursing advice and tell you heartwarming
and ill-humored stories of what it takes to be a nurse. We thank you. Will the administration
and management from our hospital and healthcare
agencies please stand. (audience applauds) We are fortunate to live in
a community where we receive incredible support. We thank you for the
clinical opportunities, financial support, equipment, and supplies that you consistently provide. We very much appreciate and thank you. Will the nurses, nursing
assistants, and clinical staff who worked with our nursing
students please stand. (audience applauds) We couldn’t have done this without you. We thank you for your
wisdom, guidance, nurturing, and understanding that you have shared. Our goal is to become
a nurse, just like you. Will Linda Harris, division
chair, nursing faculty, and our student success
specialists please stand. (audience applauds) I guess it’s difficult to
hear me when I’m talking to the audience behind me. These faculty are constantly
thinking of ways to help you become extraordinary
nurses that care and think through every
patient care situation that comes your way. Their dedication,
commitment, and hard work have brought you here today. They are proud of you. I know you will have days
when you think of them and thank them for the
education they have given you. (audience applauds) Two of our newest faculty
members deserve recognition for their own milestones this year. Beth Johnson has taught
with us for four years and was approved by the
college board of trustees this spring to receive
tenured faculty status. Kip Mills has just
completed her first year of teaching with us. (audience applauds) She and the class of 2016
will always have that special bond of being her first. There are many other
people we need to recognize and thank for getting you here today. Our nursing program
specialist Claudia Ferriday and the three other backbones
of our nursing office, Sarah Twisseleman, Rita
Blue, and Kelly Bartel. (audience applauds) Adrian Smith, who works
in admissions and records and processed your admission applications and pulled together
your nursing transcripts to send to the board
of registered nursing. Regina Rand, our nursing counselor. Our dean’s assistant Margie Alred. It goes on and on, our research department of two
Ryan Cartnel and Amy Laroux, the computer and I.T. guys,
the physical plan guys, our foundation and private donors. There are many, many others,
but I do need to move on. We want to thank you all from
the bottom of our hearts. I am now honored to
introduce and welcome our academic dean, Dr. Jason
Curtis to the podium. (audience applauds) – Well good morning, everyone. Thank you for joining us to
celebrate this exciting moment in the lives of this year’s
nursing program graduates. To begin, I’d like to thank
a couple additional people. The following dignitaries who
have joined us this morning, I’ll ask them each to stand
and please hold your applause until I’ve had the chance
to recognize all of our distinguished guests. From the Cuesta College
administration, Dr. Gil Stork, superintendent president. Dr. Deb Wulff, assistant
superintendent, vice president of academic affairs. Sandee McLaughlin,
assistant superintendent, vice president of student services. Dan Troy, assistant
superintendent, vice president of administrative services. Dr. John Pescamo, dean of workforce and economic development. Michael Jacobs, interim
dean of arts, humanities, and social sciences. Dr. Maria Escobedo, executive
dean north country campus and south county centers. Catherine Riedstra, dean
of student services. From the Cuesta College foundation, Bernice and Glen Carlson. From French Hospital,
Bianca Lynne representing the CEO’s office. From Twin Cities Community
Hospital, Mark Lisa, CEO. And Joan Fonda, CNO. From Arroyo Grande Hospital, Carrie Now. Melinda Van Veen-McClane,
Amber Rogers, from Central Coast Health and Hospice, Brandy Columbo, director of patient care services. And from the department of state hospitals at Atascadero, Megan Wills, representing the director’s office. (audience applauds) I also want to take a moment, personally, to recognize the family
and friends as Marcia did. Family and friends of the
graduates, for all the support that they provided these
students over the past two years. So in my brief remarks this morning, I want to say a few
words about confidence, starting with the
confidence that I as dean have in this outstanding
group of faculty and staff. The nursing program has two main goals: one, that students have
facilitated optimal health for individuals, families, and groups, and two, that students are
able to obtain licensure and pursue a career in nursing. Every year, this team
with whom I’m fortunate to share the platform this morning produces highly skilled
and qualified graduates in accordance with the program goals. In particular, I’d like to
recognize the excellent work done by our director Marcia
Scott, who has overseen the program gracefully this
past year while juggling a number of additional
tasks for other programs in nursing and allied health. I’d also like to express
my admiration for the work that Linda Harris has
done as division chair for the past two years. It truly is a pleasure to
work with this respected and accomplished group. (audience applauds) I also want to express
the confidence that we at Cuesta have in our students. How confident are we that
these students will be able to obtain licensure and pursue a career? Immensely. The state measures nursing
programs in a variety of ways. One of those measures
includes employment outcomes. A new analytical tool
recently released by the state chancellor’s office allows
us to look at wage gains for students who complete our program. On average, our students
experience a $40,000 increase in the annual salary within
one year of graduation. (audience applauds) Another measure of program
success is the past rate for first time test takers on the NCLEX. The NCLEX is a standardized
test that all nursing students must take and pass in order to be licensed as a registered nurse. Nationally, about 80% of
associate degree graduates pass the test on their first try. Cuesta’s nursing faculty have
set their benchmark at the expectation that 90% will
pass on the first try. Now, as dean, it would
be irresponsible of me to allow an entire program to be
defined by a single measure on a national standardized test, no matter how much we’d
like to celebrate it. This program’s success is
based on much more than that. Besides, I don’t want to
jinx anything by mentioning our pass rates the last two years. (audience laughs) And that leads me to the
confidence that I want our graduates to have in themselves and take with them as they leave today. A quiet confidence that
you are the products of a strong program that has had fantastic outcomes for years. You have all the tools
and knowledge needed to pass the NCLEX. And when you start your first
position as a registered nurse there will be even more to
learn in those first few months on the floor, but you have
the preparation and ability. Be open to the possibility
of further education, whether through our new
partnership with CSU Monterey Bay, that allows our graduates to
earn their Bachelor of Science in nursing locally, within one year, or another program that fits your needs. And we hope that somewhere down the line, some of you will come back to Cuesta as clinical instructors, full-time faculty, or maybe even director. We are proud to have you as graduates of the Cuesta nursing program, and we are confident that you will excel as nurses in our community. Thank you. (audience applauds) – At this time, I would like to introduce our faculty speakers. The first speaker will be Linda Harris. Linda has been a nurse for 43 years and a pillar of our nursing
program for 18 years. She has taught in both the first and second year of the program, and currently serves as division chair. Linda is resigning from her division chair at the end of this academic year and will be going back to teaching full-time in the classroom. She will be missed for her
humor, logic, and organization, but her talents will continue
with us in her faculty role. (audience applauds) – It is my honor to speak to
you, nursing class of 2016, representing the nursing faculty. I thought about what I
would want most for you as you leave to pursue your
career as a registered nurse. After careful consideration,
my wish for you is inspiration. You may think that I’m taking
this final moment to once again implore you to just breathe. Certainly you will have many
moments as a registered nurse when you will need to remember to breathe. But my with for you is a
different kind of inspiration. Inspiration can be defined
as having been intellectually or emotionally moved to
action by someone else. I hope you have found instructors
here who inspired you, helped you to find your true passion, motivated you to achieve
more, and supported you. I am optimistic that you
have discovered mentors and role models among us. Sadly, although our
imprint on you will remain, with time your memories of us will fade. The exact details and
moments of inspiration will lose footing among
the new memories you create during your nursing career. We are honored and grateful
for the opportunity to have been a part of
your path of discovery, and hope that you will remember
the Cuesta nursing program as the place where you found inspiration. But my desire for you now is
inspiration that lives in you and is sustainable over time. I found the words to express
the sustainable inspiration from the poet Wisława
Szymborska in her Pullitzer acceptance speech, she reflected on the nature of inspiration. These are some of her
words, with one slight edit. There is, there has been,
there will always be a certain group of people
whom inspiration visits. It’s made up of all those
who’ve consciously chosen their calling and do their
job with love and imagination. It may include nurses,
teachers, gardeners, I could list a hundred more professions. Their work becomes one
continuous adventure as long as they manage
to keep discovering new challenges in it. Difficulties and setbacks
never quell their curiosity. A swarm of new questions emerges from every problem they solve. Whatever inspiration is,
it’s born from a continuous, “I don’t know.” That’s the inspiration I wish for you. To never be satisfied or
content with what you know. To possess boundless imagination. To be regularly astounded. To look for opportunity in
what seems common and decided. I wish you inspiration that
is a constant companion fed by experience, new
knowledge, and those that participate with you
in the quest to answer the next, and the next, and
the next “I don’t know”. Inspiration is what has sustained
me over my nursing career that now spans 43 years
and still counting. How could I wish for
anything less for you. Congratulations on your achievement. And as promised, you’re ready. (audience applauds) – Our second faculty speaker
is Dr. Antonia Torrey, commonly known as Tony. Tony teaches in the
first year of the program and has been a nurse for 31 years. She has taught in the
nursing program for 15. She is also a Cuesta
graduate, who has advanced her nursing education
throughout the years from an associate degree to doctorate degree. Our college president Dr. Gil
Stork will be recommending Tony to be our next division
chair at the upcoming June board of trustees meeting. Tony will bring her talents
and vast knowledge of nursing and education to
this division chair role. (audience applauds) – Well I also want to extend
my welcome to the families, the friends, and the supporters
of this extraordinary nursing class. Nurse graduates, I am very
honored to speak to you on this special occasion. You have gone through an intense academic and professional journey
these last two years. One that can only be completed
through determination, diligence, and a lot of hard work. This ceremony is our rite
of passage to recognize your efforts and to
acknowledge your readiness to enter the profession of
nursing and care for humanity. Simply put, nursing school
is where students learn to care for patients. In caring for patients, we
are privileged to interact with people at their
most vulnerable moments. Birth, death, grief, sadness, suffering. I believe that this is the sacred space we occupy as nurses. And that’s what I want
to talk to you about, and I hope you would permit me to tell you one last story from my nursing career to illustrate this. So, one morning I received
report on a postpartum patient that I was to care for that day. I learned that since she had
delivered a few days earlier, she had been experiencing
a severe spinal headache. The doctors and given her blood patches, various medications, nothing had worked. And the hope was that with
enough rest and fluids and time, she would get better. I also learned that her husband
had taken the new baby home, this was something completely unprecedented in my experience. When I entered her room
it was dark and quiet and had a sour, unwashed smell. I saw my patient lying motionless in bed with her pillow over her eyes. When I spoke to her, she lifted a corner, looked at me bleakly and
told me that she could only tolerate lying completely flat. I assessed her as gently as I could, really the only things I
found wrong were that she was exhausted, obviously depressed,
and with the slightest elevation of her head, she felt excruciating pain and nausea. I think you knew what came next. It was clearly time for
therapeutic communication. So I pulled up a chair and sat near to her and I told her that I knew this
had to be very hard for her. She began to speak to me of
the days since the birth, how she felt that everyone
had given up on her, that we were tired of trying to help her, how much she missed her new
baby and her other children, that her husband was becoming
increasingly worried about her and that she had begun to
feel she would never get well. I was empathetic for all I was worth. I restated and reflected, I wanted her to know she was fully heard. And then I suggested the
only other intervention I could think of. I told her that I knew
she would feel better if we got her cleaned up. Now, there was no way she
could stand for a shower, and a sponge bath was not going to cut it, so I went to the maintenance department and I got two big black
industrial strength trash bags, nurses are very good at making do, and I put them underneath
her and rolled up the edges to make a rim. Then I gave her a real bath in that bed using lots of sudsy, warm water. I washed her from head to toe, and by the time we were finished, and I had her in a fresh
gown on clean linen, she was feeling a little better. I’d gotten a smile out her and we’d gotten to know each
other a little better. So I tucked her in with some
pillows, lots of pillows, that’s another useful nursing tool, and I left her to rest. She called me a little while
later to go to the bathroom and when I started to
giver her the bedpan, she said, “No”. She thought she would try to get up and go into the bathroom. Now she was very rocky on her feet, but she made it there,
and when she came back she said maybe she would try
sitting up for little bit. When her husband came later that morning, he found his wife sitting in a chair, smiling radiantly, her
headache completely gone. She was discharged home to her
family a short while later. So, what do you think? Was is just a sheer
coincidence of timing that she recovered that morning? I will tell you that she and
her husband were convinced that that bath had worked a miracle. So I don’t know about miraculous baths, but what I do know is this: being with our patients fully
when they experience illness, listening to them, and
attending to them with respect. These are the simple,
basic acts of nursing that embody the power and
profound essence of what we do. Class of 2016, the time
has come for you to go out into the world and begin
your own nursing careers. I know that you will
continue to inspire us with your intellect and your worthiness. Remember always that compassionate care is the heart of nursing. And the power of care is in your hands. Thank you. (audience applauds) – Representing the class of
2016 as their student speakers is Scott Gunn and Daniel Gastelo. Our first class speaker is Scott Gun. (audience applauds) – Thank you to everyone here
to celebrate our graduation with our class today. I’d like to show special appreciation first and foremost to god. I know I wouldn’t be here without his love, mercy, and grace. I want to thank my brothers
Shaun and Sherwin and my dad for their love and support. I want to thank and
congratulate my girlfriend Julia who graduates tomorrow from Fresno State. I want to recognize our instructors, both in class and clinical, my preceptors Lianne, Cindy, and Corey,
and the hospital staff and administrations for
allowing us to hone our skills in the clinical setting. It’s like you had us there for a reason. Teaching us the ins and outs
of your respective hospitals because one day you might
want us to work there alongside of you? Call me crazy, but it was a good plan. Now it’s time to follow
through and hire us. (audience applauds) Seriously, I wanted to highlight
someone very special to me. She’s been an inspiration since day one, and probably the biggest
reason I ever even applied for the RN program. And I told her I’d wear her
hat today, I mean I could. It doesn’t fit very well
’cause I don’t have hair. Her name was Claire
Gunn and she was my mom. She inspired me by being and
RN herself for 20 plus years raising three boys, being
full of life and love, and for battling cancer for 16 years before going up to heaven in 2008. She was my daily inspiration while writing care plans at 2 AM, waking up at 4 AM, and driving from Longpoke
every day to Cuesta and the various hospitals
I was able to work at. She always said I should
have been a nurse, but it took me five years at UCLA, failed applications to
different career paths, and my own pride to get me to where she wanted me to be today. Though my mom has been
my biggest inspiration, I can honestly say that
interacting with my classmates and in the hospital has
been awe-inspiring every day and has helped push me
to where we are today. I was inspired by the mothers and fathers who had to sacrifice their
family time to study. I’ve been inspired by my
classmates who had to take care of sick family members,
which took away from time invested in school. I was inspired by those who
were pregnant and had children while in nursing school. I was inspired by classmates
who sacrificed distance away from their family and
loved ones for two years, even family in another part of the world. I was inspired by those who
persevered past heartbreak while in school, and was so
excited for those who got engaged and married
while in nursing school. I will continue to be awe-inspired
by having the privilege and the ability to see
the continuum of life unfold before my eyes as a nurse. I cried at my first birth,
you can ask Tony Torrey. I held the hand of a cancer patient while thinking of my mother’s
struggle with this illness. I rejoice when a patient
in acute care rehab center regained some function in
his arms after a stroke. Was terrified at a code
crimson in the E.R. And said a prayer after someone expired in the bed next to my patient. It is only after analyzing
all of these events and more can I honestly say that
I’m anxious and excited to continue to find hope
in times of struggle, strength from brother and sister nurses, and staff that work around me, and wisdom to trust my nursing judgement. I want to be able to end
my career as a nurse, saying that it was never
about the money I earned, the advancement or recognition I received, or the legacy I left at
each facility I worked in. But that I did it for a higher calling. For the love and respect of the patients, and for hope in myself as a caregiver to have given the people I care for a better respect for the gift of life. Thank you. (audience applauds) – Our second class
speaker is Daniel Gastelo. (audience applauds) – Well, there’s really no
following that, absolutely not, no matter what I say, or how
hard I try it’s over with. Good job, Scott, really appreciate you and you really inspired
us, you were there for us every single day picking us up. You were always the positive
person, and that meant a lot to us as a class because
we could look to you when things were tough and we always knew Scott had our back (mumbles). Alright, so, now on to mine. Don’t hold me up to his standards please. So if someone asked me to
describe nursing school today in one sentence, you know what I’d say? I’d say that it’s the most fun you’ll never want to have again. So, on that note let’s
give it up to our faculty for allowing us to have that much fun. (audience applauds) But then keeping us in check
when we really needed it. So first I want to start by thanking everyone for coming out. Without your love and support
we would not be here today. And most people just say that to be nice, but we really, really, really mean it. Marcia told us from day
one not to be afraid to utilize our resources,
i.e. our families. And she was definitely right about that. Without you guys, there’s
no way we’d be standing here or sitting, or even standing period. So thank you for that. I know without my family, personally, I probably would have developed
early-onset Alzheimers and wandered off after the first semester. So thanks for keeping tabs on me (mumbles) we appreciate that. So, which leads my to my point. We may have had to suffer
through what seemed like riding a unicycle through
hell in high heels, but it’s our families who
kept those wheels greased. So thank you guys, we
really appreciate it. There’s an old African proverb that goes, “If you want to go somewhere
fast, go by yourself. But if you want to go
far, go with others.” So thanks for being there,
thanks for supporting us. Now to my fellow
classmates, hey we did it! Started from the bottom! (audience applauds) We made it! I’m just kidding, you guys
still have to pass the test so don’t get too excited. But seriously, who can
tell me what this is? Uh huh, that’s right
Jessi, it’s “the book”. This is where we started from. This is the handbook that
we got at orientation, which stated everything down to the tee, even to how long your nails can be, which I always had issues with, but you know I’m not gonna go into that. So, this is where we started from, and who would have thought
that we know all the things that we “sort of” know now? Don’t tell anybody that, we
really do know it, ask Linda. Let’s just say that things
were a little awkward at first. Orientation was a little weird
with feeling each other out. But really, that’s nothing
compared to our first day in long-term care, right? Yeah, uh huh, yeah let’s
just say that I was absolutely amazed that I was able to keep my whites actually white. Yeah, so good job guys for doing that. But seriously, there
were the tough times the “oh my god, I just kind of
puked in my mouth” times. And the downright terrifying days. But enough about Beth’s class. (audience laughs) Let’s focus on the good times. Like placing your first foley
cath, do you remember that? I know you do, come on. Well maybe not that time,
what about your first successful foley cath, yeah? That was a lot better, right? Until I tried to high-five my nurse, she was not having that. Let’s just say I learned something about bedside manner that day. Anyway, it’s the little
victories like that that help carry us
through the tough times, like the late night study sessions, having to miss family events because you needed to memorize all 12 cranial nerves, the side-effects of 157
different classes of medications, and write seven care plans, all while thinking what
you had to make for dinner for your entire family. But then it hits you. This isn’t even your house,
these aren’t even your kids. Well, let’s hope they were kind enough to let you stay for dinner. Hashtag nursing life. So you see where I’m going with this? We went through some stuff,
like crazy action hero stuff, most of which I cannot
repeat on this stage, and honestly some of which I
really wish I could un-see, but it’s not gonna happen. But hey, what doesn’t kill
you makes you stronger, right? And I’m gonna go out on a
limb and say that we’re much stronger today than the
first day we started. And when it’s all said and done and the dust has finally settled, we did it. We’re here. We’re about to be real-life nurses. No more pretend nursing,
we’re in the big leagues. So it’s time to pull up your pants, get ready to go, and let’s rock ‘n roll, and the good news about it,
no more white pants, guys. Aren’t you stoked about that? Right? So, now it’s up to us,
it’s on our shoulders to take care of our patients,
to be their advocate, to look out for them, and
to catch a neuro patient if they’re decompensating as evidenced by one new blown pupil. No pressure or anything. But you know what the
cool part about that is? Well, obviously nothing for the patient, except that they’re one of our patients and ain’t nobody gonna
decompensate on our shift, that’s for sure. You know why? Because we’re graduated of
Cuesta College School of Nursing which makes us prepared. We have an elite set of skills, I know you’ve heard that a few times. Skills that are capable of
anything and everything, whether it’s changing
dressings, taking the first set of vital signs on a newborn
baby, or hanging a unit of blood for an anemic patient in
end-stage renal failure, or even like Scott said,
holding the hand of a patient while they were diagnosed with cancer. But we can and we will do it. We possess these skills
and many, many more. Now be confident knowing
that you’re pretty much a superhero in semi-professional P.J.s. Don’t forget that. So go confidently into the
night or the night shift, rather, and do what we do best, change the world one patient at a time. Thank you. (audience applauds) – The class of 2016 has
created a slideshow as a meaningful memory of their two
years in the nursing program. We invite you sit back and experience this small portion of what it
takes in the classroom and clinical setting to become a nurse. (“Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor) (“Use Somebody” by Kings of Leon) (“Home” by Phil Phillips) (“I Won’t Back Down” by Tom
Petty and The Heartbreakers) (“Started From the Bottom” by Drake) Today, each graduate will
walk proudly across the stage and receive a white satin nursing stole and a nursing pin. The white satin stole with
green embroidery elegantly displays RN class of 2016 on the left sash accompanied by the name
Cuesta College on the right. White is traditionally known
as the universal symbol that characterizes humanity,
knowledge, comfort, hygiene, and caring that infuses the work and spirit of nursing. Presenting graduates with a
pin is a time-honored tradition that signifies the student’s
official passage into the nursing profession. The history of pinning can be
traced back to the crusades of the 12th century, when
knights and monks who tended to the injured and sick
were given a cross. And to Florence Nightingale,
who is considered the founder of nursing, who was awarded
a red cross in recognition for her service to injured
soldiers during the Crimean war. As we get ready to present
the graduating class with their white satin
sashes and nursing pins, please know that this
is a photo opportunity for you and welcome you
to quietly come and line in front of the stage to take a picture of your nursing student. The class will receive their
stole and pin in alphabetical order so you can anticipate
when they’ll be coming forward. Once your graduate has
walked across the stage, kindly return to your seat and make room for the next paparazzi to come in. Donning the white satin
stoles will be faculty members Beth Johnson and Monica Millard. (audience applauds) Calling names will be
faculty member Rick Staley. (audience applauds) And placing the nursing
pin on the student’s stole will be Kif Mills. (audience applauds) Faculty members will now present
the nursing class of 2016 with their nursing stoles and pins. (audience applauds) – [Rick] Marta Aliaga. Marina Bartholomew. Katelyn Bell. Muir Black. Joshua Brand. Katie Cordsen. Deanna Daugherty. Tiffanie Delaney. Angelina Diaz. Hilary Elgin. Sara Ferrante. Joy Friesen. Martha Fuerte. Daniel Furlong. Daniel Gastelo. Amanda Goldstein. Scott Gunn. – Today, each graduate will
walk proudly across the stage and receive a white satin
nursing stole and a nursing pin. The white satin stole with
green embroidery elegantly displays RN class of 2016 on the left sash accompanied by the name
Cuesta College on the right. White is traditionally known
as the universal symbol that characterizes humanity,
knowledge, comfort, hygiene, and caring that infuses the work and spirit of nursing. Presenting graduates with a
pin is a time-honored tradition that signifies the
student’s official passage into the nursing profession. The history of pinning can be
traced back to the crusades of the 12th century when
knights and monks who tended to the injured and sick were given a cross. And to Florence Nightingale,
who was considered the founder of nursing who was awarded
a red cross in recognition for her service to injured
soldiers during the Crimean war. As we get ready to present
the graduating class with their white satin sashes and nursing pins, please know that this is a
photo opportunity for you and we welcome you to quietly
come in line in front of the stage to take a picture
of your nursing student. The class will receive their
stole and pin in alphabetical order, so you can anticipate
when they’ll be coming forward. Once your graduate has
walked across the stage, kindly return to your seat and make room for the next paparazzi to come in. Donning the white satin stoles will be faculty members Beth
Johnson and Monica Millard. (audience applauds) Calling names will be
faculty member Rick Staley. (audience applauds) And placing the nursing
pin on the student’s stole will be Kif Mills. (audience applauds) Faculty members will now present
the nursing class of 2016 with their nursing stoles and pins. (audience applauds) – [Rick] Marta Aliaga. Marina Bartholomew. Katelyn Bell. Muir Black. Joshua Brand. Katie Cordsen. Tiffanie Delaney. Angelina Diaz. Hilary Elgin. Sara Ferrante. Joy Friesen. Martha Fuerte. Daniel Furlong. Daniel Gastelo. Amanda Goldstein. Scott Gunn. Joanne Halvorson. Heather Harris. Shannon Hinrichsen. Anna Ho. Ashley Julian. Megan La Pier. Samantha Lincer. Stephanie Mangrubang. Lisa Mansfield. Sharon Marshall Barton. Barbara Meyer. Katherine Mueller. Marina Nikolakakis. Jessi Norris. Melissa Penner. April Saiz. Shelley Sassenberg. Talitha Stewart. Krissy Stone. Marissa Tompkins. Amanda Young. Christen Zybura. – We are rapidly approaching
the time when we release these student nurses into
the nursing profession. We would like to do this
in a manner than honors and includes our nursing community. We ask that all the nurses
here today come forward and make a pathway for
these nursing students to walk through as they
exit, transforming them from the world of
nursing to graduate nurse and the newest members of our profession. So will the nurses in
the community come down and form a pathway along
each side of the white chairs for the graduates to exit through. (audience applauds) No along the outside. So yeah, face each other
so that you form a tunnel for them to exit through. Okay. Everybody in place? Nursing class of 2016, please stand and face forward for a moment to look at your nursing faculty and thank them one last time from the eyes of a nursing student. (audience applauds) The nursing faculty and I
would like to say this to you: it has been our pleasure
to watch you learn and accomplish things which you once thought were impossible. You have gained
assertiveness and confidence to perform one of the most
noble professions in the world: nursing. We are proud of you and
welcome you to our profession. The faculty will now
place themselves at the front of the pathway you will exit through to symbolize your bridge
from student nurse to nursing community. You are entering a profession
where coworkers become family. You will develop unshakable
trust and friendships that will last a lifetime
with your fellow nurses. Embrace this. Now, class of 2016, turn
and face the audience. (audience applauds) I am proud and honored to present you the Cuesta College nursing class of 2016. Class dismissed. (audience applauds) (“Happy” by Pharrell)