10 Ways Street Fighter II Was Changed Outside Japan

10 Ways Street Fighter II Was Changed Outside Japan


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free. Today we’ll be taking a look at Street Fighter
II and ways that it and its many different versions were changed between the Japanese
and English regions. For a game with as many different ports and
versions as Street Fighter II, there are quite a lot of different regional differences between
versions. And so this video will be list-styled video
taking a look at 10 of the bigger, more interesting ones. And so, without further ado, number 1: Character
Profiles Some of the games would show profiles for
each of the characters when booting up the game. This can be found in the SNES games for example. However, over in Japan, these profiles were
much more detailed and provided info such as the fighters’ likes and dislikes, as
well as various background info. Ryu’s likes for instance are 1: martial
arts and then 2: Mizu Youkan, which is a Japanese food that’s a sweet jelly made from red
bean paste. His dislike on the other hand is said to be
spiders, which is interestingly something that will occasionally be brought up again
in the franchise, including in the English version of Marvel vs Capcom 3. Here Ryu will speak about his hatred of spiders
at the start of rounds whenever facing off against Spider-man. Conversely, when beating Spider-man he will
proclaim that that wasn’t so scary after all. The other section of the bio speaks about
how we wants to become a true martial artist, as well as wanting to follow Ken abroad. And you can find detailed character profiles
like this for each of the characters. The English bios however cut all of these
details out. They also change the various units of measurement
and also covert the birth year from the Japanese imperial calendar system to the Western system. Number 2: Continue Screen Tips
In the arcade versions during the continue screen, it is only in Japan where tips will
pop up at the bottom of the screen to try and help the player become better at the game. These messages advise players on different
strategies they can use and can also give information on things like how to perform
the characters’ different moves. The English versions however display no messages
at all, whilst over in Japan, there are multiple different messages for each of the characters. Number 3: Move Names
When Cammy and Dee Jay debuted in Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers, they for
some reason had some of their moves renamed outside of Japan. This affected Dee Jay’s “Slash!” attack…
which was renamed overseas to “Max Out!” For Cammy, two moves were affected. One being the Japanese version’s “Cannon
Spike”… which was changed in English to “Thrust Kick”. The other was “Spiral Arrow”… which
was changed in the west to “”Cannon Drill”. These name changes would be used in multiple
games in the franchise. Nowadays however, the Japanese names are used
worldwide. Number 4: Ken’s Stage
A change was made to the background of Ken’s stage, Battle Harbor. This stage, which is set in the US, shows
a port with a crowd of characters cheering the fighters on from a boat. However, for the SNES release of the original
game, one of these background characters had his animation changed. In the Japanese SNES release, his arm gesture
could perhaps be misinterpreted for doing something rude. In the English version, released only a month
later, this was changed to remove any confusion over what he is doing. The Japanese animation wasn’t included in
any other versions, including the earlier arcade release where he instead sticks his
arm up right into the air. And then for the next SNES game, Street Fighter
II Turbo: Hyper Fighting, he again sticks his arm right up in the air in all versions,
like in arcades. Number 5: The Music
Speaking of the SNES versions, the final game released on SNES had some interesting differences
in music between regions. For some reason, Super Street Fighter II:
The New Challengers has lots of differences in the music – ranging from new instrument
samples, different pitches and changes in loudness. Most of the music was changed, with some being
more subtle than others, but for a brief comparison, here’s a clip from the Japanese version’s
Guile’s Theme… And then the English releases… Number 6: Akuma
There are number of differences between regions in relation to the secret playable character
Akuma. In the Japanese versions, he has multiple
different win quotes that he can say. In the English versions though, all of these
were removed and he says nothing at all. Comparably, similar changes were made to Akuma’s
endings. There are 2 different endings, one when you
beat the game by beating Bison and then the secret ending when you fight Akuma instead. When beating the game with Akuma, both of
these endings are a bit longer in Japan due to the English versions removing all of Akuma’s
dialogue from the scenes. Number 7: Win Quotes
Another case of Capcom cutting down on the translation overseas, the win quotes were
drastically reduced outside of Japan. In Japan, characters could have many different
things that they would say when winning, including in the arcade and SNES games. Some characters could have nearly 10 different
quotes. In the English versions though, there would
be only 1 or 2 quotes for each of the characters. Number 8: Game Names
The names of some of the Street Fighter II games are also a little different over in
Japan. The dash symbol after “Street Fighter II”
in some of the games’ names actually stands for a word in the Japanese versions. Over in Japan, this symbol stands for the
word “dash” and is spoken out loud when saying the games’ full names. Alongside this, “Super Street Fighter II
Turbo” is instead called “Super Street Fighter II X: Grand Master Challenge” in
Japan. These differences led to some other changes
in 2003’s Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition, the last version of the game released
for arcades. Here, you could select different play types
when starting the game – with each being based on the previous games. Over in Japan, two of these play types have
different names due to the game name changes, with the English version’s “Super T”
and “Champ” being called “Super X” and “Dash” respectively. Number 9: The Intro
Street Fighter II’s original intro, which shows two fighters squaring off in front of
a tall building, would be changed in the English versions of Street Fighter II – Special Champion
Edition for the Sega Genesis. Special Champion Edition was the first game
released for the Genesis and, in the Japanese version, the fighter that gets punched was
black like in all previous games in both Japan and the west. Capcom USA’s director of marketing John
Gillin explained in a 2014 interview with Polygon that he had received a letter from
a fan distressed at possible racial overtones. He explained that this is something he hadn’t
previously noticed, but he agreed, and thus the fighter was redesigned for the English
versions. Number 10: Character Names
And then for perhaps the biggest change that was made to Street Fighter II overseas and
one that has gone on to affect all later games in the series. All boss characters, with the exception of
Sagat, were renamed outside of Japan. Balrog is instead M. Bison, Vega is Balrog
and M. Bison is Vega. Like mentioned this would go on to be made
to all future games in the franchise and is said to be due to 2 reasons. The first of these is due to similarities
between M. Bison and the famous real life boxer Mike Tyson. Capcom USA were worried about running into
legal troubles over in the West if the name was kept the same, which led to it being swapped
around. Alongside this, Capcom USA felt that the name
“Vega” would be a weak name for the game’s main villain and so swapped that around too,
leading to the names that we still use today. What do you think about the changes mentioned
in the video and what video game regional differences would you like to see covered
next? As always, please let us know your thoughts
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